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dent of the rest of the sentence, is in the nominative case absolute.' Pursuing is a present participle, derived from the verb, pursue, present participle pursuing, perfect pursued, compound perfect having pursued, and refers to the noun, dog, with which it agrees. Rule: Participles connected with independent nouns have an agreement with the nouns.' The is the definite article, agreeing with track. Rule. Track is a common noun, of the neuter gender, singular number, third person, and in the objective case, governed by the participle, pursuing: Rule: 'Participles govern nouns and pronouns in the objective case. They is a personal pronoun, of the plural number, third person, nominative case, and subject of the verb, overtook. Rule: When a noun or pronoun is the subject of a verb, it must be in the nom native case.' Overtook is an irregular, active-transitive verb, in the indicative mode, imperfect tense, plural number and third person, agreeing with its nominative case, they. Rule: Active transitive verbs govern the objective case.' Him is a personal pronoun, masculine gender, singular number, third person, and in the objective case, governed by the active transitive verb, overtook. Rule.

This bounty has relieved you and us; and has gratified the donor.'

This is a demonstrative adjective pronoun, and refers to bounty. Bounty is a common noun, of the third person, singular number, and nominative case to has relieved. Has relieved is a regular verb active, indicative mode, perfect tense, third person singular, agreeing with its nominative, bounty. You is a personal pronoun, second person plural, in the objective case, and governed by has relieved. And is a copulative conjunction, connecting you and us. Us is a personal pronoun, and is put in the same case with you.

Rule: Conjunctions connect the same modes and tenses of verbs, and cases of nouns and pronouns.' And is a copulative conjunction. Has gratified is in the same mode and tense with has relieved, according to the above mentioned rule. The is the definite article. Donor is

a common noun, of the third person, singular number, and in the objective case, governeů by the active verb, has gratified. Rule: Active verbs govern the objective case.'

Good works being neglected, devotion is false.' Good works being neglected, is the case absolute, the noun having no connexion with any personal verb, but only with a participle. Devotion is a common noun, third person, singular number, and nominative case to is. Rule: The nominative case governs the verb in number and person.' Is is an irregular neuter verb, indicative mode, present tense, and third person singular, agreeing with its nominative case 'devotion.' Rule: A verb must agree with its nominative case in number and person.' False is an adjective of the positive degree, and belongs to devotion. Rule: 'Adjectives belong to nouns which they describe.' • The Emperor, Marcus Aurelius, was a virtuous

prince.' The is the definite article. Emperor is a common noun, of the masculine gender, third person, singular number, and in the nominative case to was. Rule:

The nominative case governs the verb in number and person.' Marcus Aurelius is a proper noun, and is put by apposition in the same case with the noun' emperor.' Rule: Two or more nouns signifying the same thing are put by apposition in the same case with each other. Was is an irregular neuter verb, indicative mode, imperfect tense, and third person singular, agreeing with its nominative 'emperor.'

Rule: - A verb must agree with its nominative in number and person.' A is the indefinite article. Virtuous is an adjective, and belongs to its noun prince. Prince is a common noun, and is put by apposition in the same case with emperor' and Marcus Aurelius.'

Gentlemen, will you suffer me to proceed?' Gentlemen is a common noun, of the masculine gender, second person, plural number, and in the nomina

tive case independent. Rule: When an address is made, the noun or pronoun is put in the nominative case independent.' "Will suffer is a regular active transitive verb, indicative mode, present tense, second person plural, agreeing with its nominative you. Me is a personal pronoun, first person, singular, and in the objective case, governed by the active verb, will suffer. To proceed is a regular active intransitive verb, in the infinitive mode, governed by the preceding verb, will suffer.

"I took her to be Mary.' Iis a personal pronoun, first person, singular number, and nominative case to took. Rule: "The nominative case governs the verb in number and person.' Took is an irregular active transitive verb, present take, imperfect took, perfect participle taken, indicative mode, imperfect tense, singular number, agreeing with its nominative, I. Her is a personal pronoun, third person, singular number, feminine gender, in the objective case, and governed by the verb took. Rule: 'Active verbs govern nouns and pronouns in the objective case.' To be is an irregular neuter verb, in the infinitive mode, present tense, and governed by her. Rule: 'A verb in the infinitive mode may be governed by a noun, adjec tive, verb, or participle.' Mary is a proper noun, third person, singular number, feminine gender, in the objective case, and governed by the neuter verb to be. Rule: “Neuter verbs occasionally govern either the nominative or objective case after them.'

· The master teaches me grammar.' The is the definite article. Master is a proper noun of the third person, singular number, masculine gender, and the nominative case to teaches. Role: ? The nominative case governs the verb in number and person.' Teaches is an irregular active transitive verb, present teach, imperfect taught; perfect participle taught, indicative modé, present tense, singular number, agreeing with its nominative, master. Me is a personal pronoun, first person, singular number, objective

case, and is governed by the preposition to understood. Grammar is a proper noun, third person, singular number, objective case, and governed by teaches. Rule: • Active transitive verbs govern the objective case.'

"I was asked a question.' I is a personal pronoun, first person, singular number, and nominative case to was asked. Rule: The subject of the verb must always be in the nominative case.” Was asked is a regular passive verb, indicative mode, imperfect tense, first person singular, and agrees with its nominative, I. A is the indefinite article, and belongs to question. Question is a common noun, third person, singular, objective case, and governed by was asked Rule.

By the mind's changing the object, to which it compares any thing.'

By is a preposition. The is the definite article. Mind's is a common noun, third person singular, possessive case, and possesses changing. Rule: “A noun or pronoun, signifying possession, must be put in the possessive case.' Changing is a participial or verbal noun, third person, singular, in the objective case, and governed by the preposition by. The is the definite article. Object is a common noun third person, singular, in the objective case and governed by changing. Rule: Participles derived from active verbs, govern the objective case, the same as the verbs from which they are derived.'

To is a preposition. Which is a relative pronoun, because it relates or refers to the antecedent, object, with which it agrees in gender, number, and person. Rule: Pronouns must agree with their antecedents, and the nouns, for which they stand in gender, number, and person. It is a personal pronoun, neuter gender, third person, singular, and nominative case to compares. Compares is a regular, active, transitive verb, indicative mode, imperfect tense third person, singular, and agrees with its nominative it. Any is an indefinite adjective pronoun and refers to the noun, thing. Thing is a common noun, third person,

singular number, objective case, and governed by compares.

He did as much for them as he was able to do.' He is a personal pronoun, masculine gender, third person, singular, and nominative case to did. Did is an irregular active verb, past tense, third person,

singular, and agrees with its nominative he. As is an adverb qualifying the adjective much. Much is an adjective. For is a preposition. Them is a personal pronoun, third person, plural, objective case, and governed by for. As is a conjunction. He is a personal pronoun, third person singular, and nominative case to

Was is an irregular neuter verb, indicative mode, imperfect tense, and the third person singular, agreeing with its nominative case he. Able is an adjective. To do is an irregular active intransitive verb, infinitive mode, present tense, and is governed by the adjective, able. Rule: “A verb in the infinitive mode may be governed by a noun, adjective, verb, or participle.

was.

Peace and joy are virtue's crown.' Peace is a common noun, third person, singular, and nominative case to are. And is a copulative conjunction. Joy is a common noun, in the same case with peace. Åre is an irregular nenter verb, indicative mode, present tense, third person plural, agreeing with the nominative, peace and joy. Rule: Two or more nouns, or pronouns, in the singular number, connected by a copulative conjunction, expressed or understood, must have verbs, nouns, and pronouns, agreeing with them in the plural number.' Virtue's is a common noun, third person, singular number, and in the possessive case, governed by the noun, crown.

Rule: . One noun governs another, signifying a different thing, in the possessive case. Crown is a common noun, neuter gender, third person, singular, and nominative case. Rule: Neuter verbs have the same case after as before them.'

They spend large sums in decorating their houses.' They is a personal pronoun, third person, plural

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