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Conjugation of the regular passive verb, be loved.

TO BE LOVED.

INDICATIVE MODE.

Present Tense.
Singular.

Plural. 1 I am loved

1 We are loved 2 Thou art loved

2 Ye or you are loved 3 He is loved

3 They are loved

Imperfect Tense.
Singular.

Plural. 1 I was loved

1 We were loved 2 Thou wast loved

2 Ye or you were loved 3 He was loved

3 They were loved

Perfect Tense.
Singular.

Plural. 1 I have been loved

1 We have been loved 2 Thou hast been loved

2 Ye or you have been loved 3 He hath or has been loved 3 They have been loved

Pluperfect Tense.
Singular.

Plural. 1 I had been loved

1 We had been loyed 2 Thou hadst been loved

2 Ye or you had been loved 3 He had been loved

3 They had been loved
First Future Tense.
Singular.

Plural. 1 I shall or will be loved

1 We shall or will be loved 2 Thou shalt or wilt be loved

2 Ye or you shall or will be

loved 3 He shall or will be loved 3 They shall or will be loved

Second Future Tense.
Singular.

Plural. 1 I shall have been loved

1 We shall have been loved 2 Thou wilt have been loved 2 Ye or you will have been

loved 3 He will have been loved

3 They will have been loved

IMPERATIVE MODE.

Singular.

Plural. 1

1 2 Be thou loved, or do thou be 2 Bc ye or you loved, or do ye loved

be loved

POTENTIAL MODE.

Present Tense.
Singular.

Plural. 1 I may or can be loved

1 We may or can be loved 2 Thou mayest or canst be loved 2 Ye or you may or can be

loved
3 He may or can be loved 3 They may or can be loved

Imperfect Tense.
Singular.

Plural. 1 ] might, could, would or should i We might, could, would or be loved

should be loved 2 Thou mightst, couldst, wouldst 2 Ye or you might, could, or should be loved

would or should be loved 3 He might, could, would or 3 They mighi, could, would should be loved

or should be loved
Perfect Tense.
Singular.

Plural. 1 I may or can have been loved 1 We mayor can have been

loved. 2 Thou mayst or canst have been 2 Ye or you may or can have loved

been loved 3 He may or can have been lov- 3 They may or can have been ed

loved

Pluperfect Tense.
Singular,

Plural, 1 I miglit, could, would or shonld 1 We might, could, would or have been loved

should have been loved 2 Thou mightest, couldst, wouldst 2 Ye or you might, could, or shouldst have been loved would or should have been

loved 3 He might, could, would or 3 They might, could, would should have been loved

or should have been loved

SUBJUNCTIVE MODE,

Singular. 1 Ini be loved 2 If thou be loved 3 lf he be loved

Present Tense.

Plural.
1 If we be loved
2 If ye or you be loved

3 If they be loved.
Imperfect Tense.

Plural.
1 If we were loved
2 If ye or you were loved
3 If they were loved

Singular. 1 If I were loved 2 If thou wert loved 3 If he were loved

Perfect Tense.

Singular.

Plural. 1 If I have been loved

1 If we have been loved 2 If thou hast been loved

2 If ye or you have been loved 3 If he hath or has been loved 3. If they have been loved

Pluperfect Tense.
Singular.

Plural. 1 Ifl had been loved

1 If we had been loved 2 If thou hadst been loved 2 If ye or you had been lov.

ed 3 If he had been loved

3 If they had been loved

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EXPLANATION OF PARTICIPLES.

A participle is a word derived from a verb, participating, or sharing the properties of a verb and adjective. It has the peculiar properties of describing like an adjective, and denoting action like a verb; as, I found James catching fish.'

The participle is generally formed by adding ing, d, or ed, to the verb; as, Rule, ruling, ruled; love, loving, loved.'

Verbs have three participles; Present or Imperfect; as, loving, Perfect, loved, Compound Perfect, having loved.

The imperfect participle is always formed by adding ing to the verb, and implies a continuance or succession of the action, being, or passion. It is applicable to present, past, or future time; as, I am writing, I had or have been writing, I shall be writing.' It is not always active even when derived from an active verb; as, • The ships are now building;' . The goods are selling.' The distinguishing mark of this participle is, that it denotes an unfinished and progressive state of being, action, or passion. It is, therefore, properly termed the imperfect participle.

The perfect participle represents the action, being, or passion, as completely finished, and generally ends in d, e, n, or t; as, 'Loved, done, risen, sent.' It has a passive meaning, except when used in forming the compound tenses of the active verb. Hence, the difference between the phrases, I have written a letter,' and, 'I have a letter written.

The compound perfect participle is formed by prefixing, having or being to the perfect participle; as, Having loved; being loved.

Participles which are derived from active verbs, will govern the objective case, the same as the verbs from which they are derived; as, They found him transgressing the laws.'

Participles govern nouns and pronouns in the objective case; as, Teaching them. * Teaching us that denying ungodliness.'

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As neuter verbs occasionally govern either the nominative or objective case, after them, so participles derived from neuter verbs do the same; as, 'Who move majestically the queen of heaven.' Who moving majestically the queen of heaven,' Queen is a noun in the nominative case, and is governed by the neuter verb,

When a preposition is prefixed to a participle, the latter governs the following noun in the objective case;

. In doing this, thou shalt save thyself.? ing virtue, vice may be shunned.' Here doing and loving are participles, preceded by the prepositions in

When the imperfect participle has the definite article the, before it, the preposition of ought always to follow: in this case, the participle will become a noun.

The article the before a participial noun, and the preposition of after one, should either both be used, or omitted; as, 'You will oblige me by the sending of them;'or, ‘You will oblige me by sending them. In the latter form, the participle retains its original signification.

When the participle is not connected with a noun in the possessive case, or with a pronoun possessive, it is not to be considered a participial noun; as,

Who ever heard of a miser despising riches? ' A woman hating flattery, is a prodigy in nature.' Here despising and hating, are participles, that agree with their nouns miser and woman in the nominative case.

A participle joined to an adverb, is independent; as, * Mr. Bradford's History of Massachusetts, is, generally speaking, very well written.' Here, the participle speaking, connected with the adverb generally, is entirely independent of the sentence, in which it is used. A participle in this position, has no government of case, or agreement with any noun. Therefore, it may be called an independent participle.

Participles connected with independent nouns, have an agreement with the nouns; as, 'The sun dispersing the clouds, it began to grow warm.' Participles in this connexion, frequently govern an objective case after

them.

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