Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

Coventry, that in seven factory villages, the good work is spreading in a most powerful and pleasing manner.

Revival in Troy.-We cannot say yet, nor shall we dare to say till the last day, how many souls have been born again; but we have hope of several hundreds. There was added yesterday to the first Presbyterian church, about one hundred, besides a number by certificate. There will probably be a still larger addition to the second church. How many have entertained hopes in the churches of other denominations, I would gladly say if I could, but have no data from which to judge.

Among those who have been hopefully born again, there has been a good proportion of men-of men in their prime, of men high in talent, office, influence and wealth, of men who had previously ranged themselves in the ranks of revolt, of men who reason for themselves, and cannot be said to have been wrought upon by mere declamation. Few revivals have altered more the balance of correct and incorrect influence.

In Sherburn, Chenango Co. N. Y.—it is stated, that about 200 have been converted within a few weeks.

Long Island.--Revivals are reported in Southampton, West Hampton, and Oyster-ponds.

Salina, N.Y.-Ninety-eight have been added to this church, since July, 1827, eighty-three of whom were received from the world. We enjoyed a season of refreshing from the presence of the Lord in March and April last, which added to our communion thirty. In November last, this church agreed to hold a four days' meeting among themselves, that is, without help from abroad. During that meeting, a revival was commenced, which has continued through the winter, and at some few periods very powerfully. Fifty-three have been added to this church, as the fruits of this work; and a number more stand propounded.

Rochester, N. Y.-About 450 have already been added to the Presbyterian churches in R. as fruits of the revival enjoyed there, for some months past.

New-York City.-The work in New-York continues to be interesting in a high degree, and souls are added to the Lord daily. Almost all the churches of the Presbyterian, Dutch, Baptist, Methodist, and some of the Episcopal denominations, share in the blessing.

Erie, Pa.-The Agent of the Seamen's Friend Society visited this place in the prosecution of his work, and we understand, a revival has commenced under his preaching, of a character so deeply interesting, that it is judged best for him to remain there for the present.

In Urbana, Champaigne County, Ohio.-A revival commenced at Buck Creek, about the first of September last. As the fruits of this work, seventy-five have been gathered into the church-thirty-two males and forty-three femalesnearly sixty between sixteen and thirty years of age. More than fifty of them were previously members of a Temperance Society, and ardent spirit is nearly banished from the congregation. Several give evidence of piety, who have not yet made a profession.

Particular accounts of the work of the Lord in congregations, where the gospel is sustained by the aid of the A. H. M. S., are found in the following pages of this number.

AUXILARY SOCIETIES.

PHILADELPHIS.

The following extracts are from the Re. The Union Anniversary of the Missiona- | ports of the auxiliaries in the First and Fifth ry Societies in Philadelphia, auxiliary to Presbyterian churches. the American Home Missionary Society, The Committee of the Association con: was held in the first Presbyterian Church, || nected with the First Church, state, that on the 24th March,

"they remitted to the Parent Society, for

INDIANA MISSIONARY SOCIETY.

the year ending March 8, 1830, the sum | meet for worship, and who had enjoyed of $180, which has been appropriated, few or no means of improvement, have agreeably to the request of the Committee, become worshippers, and are reformed. to the support of the Missionary of the Within 3 months between two and three Society in Southwark, County of Philadel. hundred new members have been addedphia. The Session of our Church has | The number who meet to hear weekly lec. paid to the support of the same Missionary tures for the improvement of the mind, is during this year the sum of 100 dollars. four hundred and fifty. On the Sabbath We expect to be able to remit 400 dollars a respectable assembly of them meet to to the Parent Society for the present year, I worship at the Cherry-st. lecture room. making in the whole the sum of $500.” In the same building there is now opened

From the Report of the Association con a reading-room furnished with newspanected with the Fifth Church, we learn | pers and periodicals from all parts of the that the whole income of the year has been | V. States, and with a library-to which $909 86, of which $725 81 has been col. many resort, and where they profitably lected at the monthly concert for prayer. I spend their evenings." The sum of $73 45 was appropriated to The meeting was addressed by Rev. Dr. sundry benevolont objects. $332 90 to Skinner, and Thos.Bradford, Esq. of Philaforeign missions, and the balance of|delphia, and the Rev. Messrs. Peters and $503 51 to the purposes of the American Patton from the Executive Committee of Home Missionary Society.

the Parent Society. “This Report of the Treasurer shows, more than ever, the power of the Monthly Concert. Annual subscriptions of members, which rose in the 2d year of this So.

The Indiana Missionary Society held ciety to $135 50, have dwindled down to its eighth annual meeting at Madison, on $73,00—donations, which in the first year the 20th day of October, 1830, and was were $173.00, are now $30.00—but the opened withi a sermon by the Rev J. M. source of funds, which has been always in

Dickey. connexion with prayer, has increased. It was 31.42 in 1826, it is now $730.81, an

Extract from the Report. average of $60.00 per month. Is it not The amount of funds received this year evident that the time and place of prayer has not equalled that of either of the two for tho kingdom has become the stream preceding years : and this is particularly to to fill the treasury of Christian missions ? || be regretted when the Parent Society are The prosperity, and indeed the existence already under engagements for about thirty of our Society, is now dependent upon that thousand dollars, besides several thousand mighty union of monthly prayer, “ Thy || dollars for which the Executive Committee kingdom come,” which may now be heard have become personally responsible; and in many places and in many languages. especially as a larger amount is this year to This deeply interesting fact, that Concert be expended in the bounds of our Society. Prayer Collections, has become the corner There are no doubt several causes which stone on which we rest, has induced us, I have operated to lessen the amount of re. the past year, to hold our annual meeting ceipts into our Treasury. The presenta. on the 1st Monday evening of every month tion of other benevolent objects, has, in a of March. We wish to bo engrafted on measure, drawn away the attention of our the Monthly Concert. Prayer, we now churches from making collections for this know, will make us rich. This faith also object. Some of the churches which were has suggested the impropriety of laying in the habit of contributing, have been any restrictions on the proceeds of the making exertions to obtain comfortable Concert Prayer meetings."

places of worship, which seemed to require At the recommendation ofthis auxiliary, all their funds. In some places the supply the Parent Society appointed Rev. Albert of the destitute with the Bible, through a Judson as a labourer among the young considerable extent of country, seemed mechanics of Philadelphia. “He has or- principally to dopend on the exertions of dinarily preached twice on each Sabbath, one or two, perhaps feeble churches; and and held a Bible Class on Sabbath evening, the claims of other benevolent objects for the benefit of this interesting portion have, in some measure, divided the atten. of the community. He has also mei many |tion of the liberal: so that, although there of them at other times during the weck. || is a diminution of our receipts, there is no During the past year, between tcn and fif- | reason to believe that there is a decrease teen have professed to be born again. of liberality among the benevolent in our Numbers, who had been unaccustomed tollchurches. The diversity of sentiment re.

specting missionary operations, has, no , yard of our God, it is pleasing to look back doubt, had its effect; and perhaps the and see what has been done to see the whole amount raised in our bounds for increase of labourers and the increase of both the missionary institutions, does not churches. But nothing comparatively has equal the receipts into our Treasury for yet been done to what must be done, be. some of the former years. This shows the fore the Lord Jesus will be king of nations necessity for united effort, and we rejoice as he is king of saints. Let us redouble our to state, that measures are in train which exertions in the cause of our Lord and we hope will have a tendency to harmo- Master, and never think that our work is nize the West, and produce, to a consider- done, until every neighbourhood is erected able extent at least, united exertions in the into a church, and every church supplied missionary cause. And we hope that no. with the preached Gospel. Let us go for. thing will be wanting on the part of the ward, relying on the Lord of hosts, ever friends of this Society, to bring about so realizing that it is the blessing of his Spirit desirable an event.

alone that can make our exertions effecTo those who, a few years ago, stood al. tual in building up the cause of our Remost alone in this part of the great vinc- deemer.

CORRESPONDENCE OF THE A. H. M. S.

THE CRY OF THE NEEDY.

bourers, according to the work to be per

formed. From a Missionary in a S. Western State.

Permit me to lay before you the field lying Hlaving looked over this vast and desti. within the chartered limits of the Presbytate region, in which the providence of tery of South Carolina. In the midst of God has cast my lot, I feel that my this field, I have toiled for the last ten Christian vows, and the desolations of Zion, years—ever since I became a settled mi. unite and call upon me, as a minister of nister. This field has been occupied the everlasting gospel, to cease teaching || by a number of faithful servants of Jesus school, and enter the field as a missionary. Christ, who have long borne the burthen I am, therefore, willing to give up my and heat of the day. school, and labour as a missionary under But little has ever been published to the your care, if it may be agrocable to the world, of any success which has attended arrangements and wishes of your board. I the labours of our most aged and expeThis region is entirely destitute of Pres-rienced ministers, yet “they have not labyterian preaching, except my own labour, boured in vain, nor spent their strength for and an occasional travelling minister. nought.” Yet when we make a fair estiAll the destitute counties in this body mate of all that has been accomplished by of country, I do not exactly know, the aged or the young among us, we feel but I am confident the number is from constrained to say, "there remaineth yet twelve to fifteen. In all these counties, | very much land to be possessed.” We have thousands of souls are growing up in ig- but two ministers of our number, whose norance, and without the word of life in labours are not divided among two, three, their houses, or any to break to them the or four churches. Under circumstances bread of life.

like these, we find it impossible to pay that Now, dear sir, if the Christian churches attention to Sabbath schools, Bible feel for this people, and are disposed to classes, catechetical instruction, family send missionaries amongst them, they visitation, and many other important du. must calculate to support them, for the ties, even in our own churches, that their people themselves are not trained to give, | vast importance demands; much less can nor disposed, as yet, to support a mi-| we find time to leave our extensive charges, nister.

to visit vacant churches and destitute neighbourhoods, and feed the hungry with

the bread of life. From a Presbyterian Minister in South I have been labouring for years to disCarolina.

charge the duty of a minister in three I presume one important object of your churches, where I continue statedly to society is, to collect all the correct infor-| labour, and in addition, have performed mation possible, from every part of the considerable missionary labour in this and United States, relative to the great moral the adjoining state, till I have worn down vineyard. Then you can divide your la-llan excellent constitution in the service.

INDIANA MISSIONARY SOCIETY.

the year ending March 8, 1830, the sum || meet for worship, and who had enjoyed of $180, which has been appropriated, | few or no means of improvement, have agreeably to the request of the Committee, become worshippers, and are reformed. to the support of the Missionary of the Within 3 months between two and three Society in Southwark, County of Philadel- | hundred new members have been added phia. The Session of our Church has | The number who meet to hear weekly lec. paid to the support of the same Missionary | tures for the improvement of the mind, is during this year the sum of 100 dollars. four hundred and fifty. On the Sabbath We expect to be able to remit 400 dollars a respectable assembly of them meet to to the Parent Society for the present year, I worship at the Cherry-st. lecture room. making in the whole the sum of $500.” In the same building there is now opened

From the Report of the Association con a reading-room furnished with newspanected with the Fifth Church, we learn | pers and periodicals from all parts of the that the whole income of the year has been V. States, and with a library-to which $909 86, of which $725 81 has been col- | many resort, and where they profitably lected at the monthly concert for prayer. || spend their evenings." The sum of $73 45 was appropriated to The meeting was addressed by Rev. Dr. sundry benevolent objects. $332 90 to Skinner, and Thos. Bradford, Esq. of Philaforeign missions, and the balance of delphia, and the Rev. Messrs. Peters and $503 51 to the purposes of the American Patton from the Executive Committee of Home Missionary Society.

the Parent Society. This Report of the Treasurer shows, more than ever, the power of the Monthly Concert. Annual subscriptions of members, which rose in the 2d year of this So.

The Indiana Missionary Society held ciety to $135 50, have dwindled down to its eighth annual meeting at Madison, on $73,00—donations, which in the first year the 20th day of October, 1830, and was were $173.00, are now $30.00—but the opened with a sermon by the Rev J. M. source of funds, which has been always in Dickey. connexion with prayer, has increased. It

Extract from the Report. was 31.42 in 1826, it is now $730.81, an average of $60.00 per month. Is it not The amount of funds received this year evident that the time and place of prayer has not equalled that of either of the two for the kingdom has become the stream preceding years: and this is particularly to to fill the treasury of Christian missions ? be regretted when the Parent Society are The prosperity, and indeed the existenco already under engagements for about thirty of our Society, is now dependent upon that thousand dollars, besides several thousand mighty union of monthly prayer, “ Thy | dollars for which the Executive Committee kingdom come,'

," which may now be heard have become personally responsible; and in many places and in many languages. | especially as a larger amount is this year to This deeply interesting fact, that Concert be expended in the bounds of our Society. Prayer Collections, has become the corner There are no doubt several causes which stone on which we rest, has induced us, I have operated to lessen the amount of rethe past year, to hold our annual meeting ceipts into our Treasury. The presenta. on the 1st Monday evening of every month tion of other benevolent objects, has, in a of March. We wish to be engrafted on measure, drawn away the attention of our the Monthly Concert. Prayer, we now churches from making collections for this know, will make us rich. This faith also object. Some of the churches which were has suggested the impropriety of laying in the habit of contributing, have been any restrictions on the proceeds of the making exertions to obtain comfortable Concert Prayer meetings.”

places of worship, which seemed to require At the recommendation of this auxiliary, | all their funds. In some places the supply the Parent Society appointed Rev. Albert of the destitute with the Bible, through a Judson as a labourer among the young considerable extent of country, seemed mechanics of Philadelphia. "He has or- | principally to depend on the exertions of dinarily preached twice on each Sabbath, one or two, perhaps feeble churches; and and held a Bible Class on Sabbath evening, the claims of other benevolent objects for the benefit of this interesting portion have, in some measure, divided the atten. of the community. He has also met many |tion of the liberal: so that, although there of them at other times during the week. is a diminution of our receipts, there is no During the past year, between ten and fif-| reason to believe that there is a decrease teen have professed to be born again. of liberality among the benevolent in our Numbers, who had been unaccustomed tollchurcles. The diversity of sentiment re.

specting missionary operations, has, no , yard of our God, it is pleasing to look back doubt, had its effect; and perhaps the and sec what has been done-to see the whole amount raised in our bounds for increase of labourers and the increase of both the missionary institutions, does not churches. But nothing comparatively has equal the receipts into our Treasury for yet been done to what must be done, be. some of the former years. This shows the fore the Lord Jesus will be king of nations necessity for united effort, and we rejoice as he is king of saints. Let us redouble our to state, that measures are in train which exertions in the cause of our Lord and we hope will have a tendency to harmo- Master, and never think that our work is nize the West, and produce, to a consider. done, until every neighbourhood is erected able extent at least, united exertions in the into a church, and every church supplied missionary cause. And we hope that no. with the preached Gospel. Let us go for. thing will be wanting on the part of the ward, relying on the Lord of hosts, ever friends of this Society, to bring about so realizing that it is the blessing of his Spirit desirable an event.

alone that can make our exertions effec. To those who, a few years ago, stood al. tual in building up the cause of our Remost alone in this part of the great vine. Udeemer.

CORRESPONDENCE OF THE A. H. M. S.

THE CRY OF THE NEEDY.

bourers, according to the work to be per.

formed. From a Missionary in a S. Western State.

Permit me to lay before you the field lying Ilaving looked over this vast and desti. within the chartered limits of the Presbytate region, in which the providence of tery of South Carolina. In the midst of God has cast my lot, I feel that my this field, I have toiled for the last ten Christian vows, and the desolations of Zion, years—-ever since I became a settled mi. unite and call upon me, as a minister of nister. This field has been occupied the everlasting gospel, to cease teaching by a number of faithful servants of Jesus school, and enter the field as a missionary. Christ, who have long borne the burthen I am, therefore, willing to give up my and heat of the day. school, and labour as a missionary under But little has ever been published to the your care, if it may be agreeable to the world, of any success which has attended arrangements and wishes of your board. the labours of our most aged and expeThis region is entirely destitute of Pres. rienced ministers, yet “they have not labyterian preaching, except my own labour, boured in vain, nor spent their strength for and an occasional travelling minister. nought.” Yet when we make a fair estiAll the destitute counties in this body mate of all that has been accomplished by of country, I do not exactly know, the aged or the young among us, we feel but I am confident the number is from constrainod to say, "there remaineth yet twelve to fifteen. In all these counties, very much land to be possessed.” We have thousands of souls are growing up in ig- | but two ministers of our number, whose norance, and without the word of life in labours are not divided among two, three, their houses, or any to break to them theor four churches. Under circumstances bread of life.

like these, we find it impossible to pay that Now, dear sir, if the Christian churches attention to Sabbath schools, Bible feel for this people, and are disposed to classes, catechetical instruction, family send missionaries amongst them, they || visitation, and many other important du. must calculate to support them, for the ties, even in our own churches, that their people themselves are not trained to give, vast importance demands; much less'can nor disposed, as yet, to support a mi- we find time to leave our extensive charges, nister.

to visit vacant churches and destitute neighbourhoods, and feed the hungry with

the bread of life. From a Presbyterian Minister in South

I have been labouring for years to disCarolina.

charge the duty of a minister in three I presume one important object of your churches, where I continue statedly to society is, to collect all the correct infor-| labour, and in addition, have performed mation possible, from every part of the considerable missionary labour in this and United States, relative to the great moral the adjoining state, till I have worn down vineyard. Then you can divide your la-lan excellent constitution in the service.

« ZurückWeiter »