Lives of the Engineers: With an Account of Their Principal Works; Comprising Also a History of Inland Communication in Britain, Band 4

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Seite iii - Bid harbours open, public ways extend, Bid temples worthier of the God ascend, Bid the broad arch the dangerous flood contain, The mole projected break the roaring main ; Back to his bounds their subject sea command, And roll obedient rivers through the land : These honours, peace to happy BRITAIN brings, These are imperial works, and worthy kings.
Seite 21 - ... motions above-mentioned hindering, much less stopping, the other ; but unanimously and with harmony agreeing, they all augment and contribute strength unto the intended work and operation ; and, therefore, I call this a semi-omnipotent engine, and do intend that a model thereof be buried with me.
Seite 147 - I intend, in many cases, to employ the expansive force of steam to press on the pistons, or whatever may be used instead of them, in the same manner as the pressure of the atmosphere is now employed in common fire engines.
Seite 26 - Operation continueth, and advanceth none of the motions above-mentioned, hindering, much less stopping the other; but unanimously, and with harmony agreeing they all augment and contribute strength unto the intended work and operation: And therefore I call this A Semi-omnipotent Engine, and do intend that a Model thereof be buried with me.
Seite 20 - ... which is but at such a distance. But this way hath no bounder, if the vessels be strong enough ; for I have taken a piece of a whole cannon, whereof the end was burst, and filled it...
Seite 501 - ... the world the effects of which, extraordinary as they are, are perhaps only now beginning to be felt, was not only the most profound man of science, the most successful combiner of powers and calculator of numbers, as adapted to practical purposes, was not only one of the most generally well-informed, but one of the best and kindest of human beings.
Seite 30 - Sir Samuel Morland's well, the use of which he freely gives to all persons, hoping that none who shall come after him, will adventure to incur God's displeasure, by denying a cup of cold water (provided at another's cost and not their own) to either neighbour, stranger, passenger, or poor thirsty beggar, July 8, 1695.
Seite 122 - He needed only to be prompted ; everything became to him the beginning of a new and serious study, and we knew that he would not quit it till he had either discovered its insignificancy or had made something of it.
Seite 72 - A Description and Draught of a new-invented Machine, for carrying Vessels or Ships out of, or into, any Harbour, Port, or River, against Wind and Tide, or in a calm.
Seite 128 - I must get rid of the condensed steam and injection-water if I used a jet as in Newcomen's engine. Two ways of doing this occurred to me. First, the water might be run off by a descending pipe, if an offlet could be got at the depth of thirty-five or thirty-six feet, and any air might be extracted by a small pump.

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