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and rouse him, like a rattling peal of thunder.

Hark, hark, the horrid sound

bas rais'd up his head:' ... "

as awak'd from the dead,
i and amaz'd, he stares around..
Revenge, revenge, Timotheus cries,

see the furies arise: i' it! i',
see the snakes that they rear,.' '

bow they hiss in their hair, and the sparkles that flash from their eyes!

behold a ghastly band,- ;

each a torch in his hand; those are Grecian ghosts, that in battle were slain,

:: and unbury'd remain'

inglorious on the plain: : give the vengeance due

to the valiant crew," behold how they toss their torches on high,

how they point to the Persian abodes, and glittering temples of their hostile gods. The princes applaud, with a furious joy; and the king seiz'd a flambeau with zealto destroy;

Thais led the way, .. to light him to his prey, and, like another Helen, fir'd another Troy.

CHORUS And the king seiz’da flambeau with zeal to destroy;

Thais led the way,

to light him to his prey, and, like another Helen, fir'd another Troy.

. Thus, long ago, .: ere heaving bellows learn'd to blow,'

while orgáns yet were mute; Timotheus, to his breathing flute, ; .

and sounding lyre,

could swell the soul to rage, or kindle soft desire.
· At last divine Cecilia came,

inventress of the vocal frame;
the sweet enthusiast, from her sacred store,

enlarg’d the former narrow bounds,

and added length to solemn sounds, ". with nature's mother-wit, and arts unknown beLet old Timotheus yield the prize, [fore.

or both divide the crown; !: he rais'd a mortal to the skies; - she drew an angel down.

GRAND CHORUS. ; .::. At last divine Cecilia came;

inventress of the vocal frame;
the sweet enthusiast, from her sacred store,

enlarg’d the former narrow bounds,

and added length to solemn sounds, with nature's mother-wit, and arts unknown beLet old Timotheus yield the prize, ! Efore.

or both divide the crown;..: is he, raisd a mortal to the skies;

she drew an angel down.

THE CHARACTER OF A GOOD PARSON. A parish priest was of the pilgrim train; an awful, reverend, and religious man. ,His eyes diffus'd a venerable grace, and charity itself was in his face. Rich was his soul, tho' his attire was poor (as God hath cloth'd his own ambassador); for such, on earth, his bless'd Redeemer bore. Of sixty years he seem'd; and well might last to sixty more, but that he liv'd too fast; refign'd himself to soul, to curb the sense; and made almost a sin of abstinence.

Yet, had his aspect vothing of severe, but such a face as promis'd him sincere. Nothing reserv'd or sullen was to see: but sweet regards, and pleasing sanctity: mild was his accent, and his action free. With eloquence innate his tongue was arm'd; tho' harsh the precept, yet the people charm'd. For, letting down the golden chain from high, he drew his audience upward to the sky: and oft with holy hymns he charm'd their ears (a music more melodious than the spheres): for David left him, when he went to rest, bis Lyre ; and after him he sung the best. He bore his great commission in his look: but sweetly temper'd awe; and soften'd all be spoke. He preach'd the joys of heaven, and pains of hell, and warn'd the sinner with becoming zeal; but, on eternal mercy lov'd to dwell. He taught the gospel rather than the law; and forc'd himself to drive; but lov'd to draw. For fear but freezes minds : but love, like heat, exhales the soul sublime, to seek her native seat, to threats the stubborn sinner oft is hard, wrapp'd in his crimes, against the storm prepard, but, when the milder beams of mercy play, be melts, and throws his cumbrous cloak away. Lightning and thunder (heaven's artillery) as barbingers before th' Alinighty fly: those but proclaim his style, and disappear; the stiller sound succeeds, and God is there.

The tithes, his parish freely paid, he took ; . but never sued, or curs!d with bell or book. With patience bearing wrong; bụt offering none; sioce every man is free to lose his own.

The country churls, according to their kind,'. (who grudge their dues, and love to be behind), the less he sought his offerings, pinch'd the more, and prais'd a priest contented to be poor.

Yet of his little he had some to spare, to feed the famisb’d, and to clothe the bare; for mortify'd he was to that degree, a poorer than himself he would not see. True priests, he said, and preachers of the word, where only stewards of their sovereign Lord; nothing was their's; but all the public store; intrusted riches, to relieve the poor. Who, should they steal, for want of his relief, he judg’d himself accomplice with the thief.

Wide was his parish; not contracted close in streets, but here and there a straggling house; yet still he was at hand, without request, to serve the sick, to succour the distress'd: tempting, on foot, alone, without affright, the dangers of a dark tempestuous night.

All this, the good old man perform’d alone, nor spar'd his pains; for curate he had none, nor durst he trust another with his care; nor rode himself to Paul's, the public fair, to chaffer for preferment with his gold, where bishoprics and sinecures are sold. But duly watch'd his flock, by night and day; and from the prowling wolf redeem'd the prey: and hungry sent the wily fox away.

The proud he tam'd, the penetent he cheerd: nor to rebuke the rich offender fear'd. His preaching much, but more his practice wrought (a living sermon of the truths be taught;). for this by rules severe his life he squar'd: that all might see the doctrine which they heard:

for priests, he said, are patterns for the rest (the gold of heaven, who bear the God impress'd :) but when the precious coin is kept unclean, the sovereign's image is no longer seen. If they be foul on whom the people trust, well máy the baser brass contract a rust.

The prelate, for his holy life he priz'd; the worldly pomp of prelaçy despis’d. His Saviour came not with a gaudy show, nor was his kingdom of the world below. Patience in want, and poverty of mind, these marks of church and churchmen he design'd, and living taught, and dying left behind. *The crown he wore was of the pointed thorn: in purple he was crucify'd, not born. They who contend for place and high degree, 'Are not his sons, but those of Zebedee.

Not but he knew the signs of earthly power might well becoine Saint Peter's successor; the holy father holds a double reign, [plain. the prince may keep his pomp, the fisher must be

Such was the saint; who shone with every grace, reflecting, Moses like, bis Maker's face. God saw his image lively was express’d; and his own work, as in creation bless'd.

The tempter saw him too with envious eye; and, as in Job, demanded leave to try.” He took the time when Richard was depos’d, and high and low with happy Harry clos'd. This prince, tho’great in arms, the priest withstood:

near tho’ he was, yet not the next in blood. · Had Richard unconstrain'd, resign'd the throne, a king can give no more than is his own: .... the title stood entaild, had Richard had a son.

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