Black Jack: John A. Logan and Southern Illinois in the Civil War Era

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SIU Press, 26.07.1995 - 314 Seiten
John A. Logan, called "Black Jack" by the men he led in Civil War battles from the Henry-Donelson campaign to Vicksburg, Chattanooga, and on to Atlanta, was one of the Union Army’s most colorful generals.



James Pickett Jones places Logan in his southern Illinois surroundings as he examines the role of the political soldier in the Civil War. When Logan altered his stance on national issues, so did the southern part of the state. Although secession, civil strife, Copperheadism, and the new attitudes created by the war contributed to this change of position in southern Illinois, Logan’s role as political and military leader was important in the region’s swing to strong support of the war against the Confederacy, to the policies of Lincoln, and eventually, to the Republican party.

 

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Inhalt

Springfield and Mary
14
Dirty Work in Washington
33
Rally Round the Flag
91
The ThirtyFirst Illinois
104
Henry and Donelson
119
Monotony in Mississippi
133
Hewing Their Way
150
Forty Rounds
178
Flanking the Devil
195
Sherman Is a Brute
212
Logan Is Carrying Egypt
230
The Year of Jubilo
244
Bibliography
287
Index
295
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Über den Autor (1995)

James Pickett Jones is Distinguished Teaching Professor of History at Florida State University.

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