Essays from the Rambler, Adventurer, and Idler

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Yale University Press, 1968 - 364 Seiten
This selection of the cream of the writing from Volumes II-V of the Yale Edition of the Works of Samuel Johnson fills the largest remaining gap in easily available eighteenth-century texts for the student and general reader. The edition provides in popular form the amplest selection available of Johnson’s essays, ranging from his great moral pieces to the valuable essays on literary criticisms. The text is that of the authoritative Yale Edition and includes full annotation. An introduction by W.J. Bate provides a concise summary of the publication history of the essays and probes in detail the moral vision that pervades most of them. Mr. Bate is Lowell Professor of the Humanities at Harvard University and joint editor of Volumes II-V of the Yale Edition of the Works of Samuel Johnson.

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There's nothing quite like a Sam Johnson essay--chiseled, Latinate marble. Many of them he wrote in one draft when he was up against a deadline because of procrastination. He was ornery and scary-smart. The balanced, periodic rhetorical style is a joy. Vollständige Rezension lesen

Inhalt

understanding 217
6
No 32 The vanity of stoicism The necessity of
15
they respect the past present and future
21
No 13 The duty of secrecy The invalidity of all
32
No 14 The difference between an authors writings
38
No 188 Favour often gained with little assistance from
44
No 196 Human opinions mutable The hopes of youth
45
to moderate the passions
50
No 176 Directions to authors attacked by criticks The various degrees of critical perspicacity
208
No 183 The influence of envy and interest compared
213
No 207 The folly of continuing too long upon the stage
226
THE ADVENTURER
231
From No 45 The difficulty of forming confederacies
233
From No 50 On lying
236
No 84 Folly of false pretenses to importance A journey in a stage coach
240
No 95 Apology for apparent plagiarism Sources of literary variety
244

From No 24 The necessity of attending to the duties
56
From No 28 The various arts of selfdelusion
64
fallacious 221
73
No 31 The defence of a known mistake highly cul
74
tience
81
No 41 The advantages of memory
86
No 45 The causes of disagreement in marriage
92
No 47 The proper means of alleviating sorrow
98
No 49 A disquisition upon the value of fame
103
No 6o The dignity and usefulness of biography
109
From No 63 Inconstancy not always a weakness
114
From No 64 The requisites to true friendship
116
No 71 No man believes that his own life will be short
118
No 72 The necessity of good humour
123
No 73 The lingering expectation of an heir
128
No 76 The arts by which bad men are reconciled to themselves
134
No 79 A suspicious man justly suspected
138
From No 85 The mischiefs of total idleness
143
From No 87 The reasons why advice is generally inef fectual
145
No 90 The pauses in English poetry adjusted
149
No 93 The prejudices and caprices of criticism
156
No 101 A proper audience necessary to a wit
161
From No 106 The vanity of an authors expectations Reasons why good authors are sometimes neglected
166
No 121 The dangers of imitation The impropriety of imitating Spenser
170
No 134 Idleness an anxious and miserable state
176
No 135 The folly of annual retreat into the country
181
No 146 An account of an author travelling in quest of his own character The uncertainty of fame
186
No 156 The laws of writing not always indisputable Reflections on tragicomedy
191
No 158 Rules of writing drawn from examples Those examples often mistaken
196
From No 159 The nature and remedies of bashfulness
201
No 165 The impotence of wealth The visit of Se rotinus to the place of his nativity
203
No 107 Different opinions equally plausible
250
No 111 The pleasures and advantages of industry
255
No 119 The folly of creating artificial wants
261
No 126 Solitude not eligible
267
No 137 Writers not a useless generation
273
THE IDLER
279
No 23 Uncertainty of friendship
281
No 27 Power of habits
284
No 30 Corruption of newswriters
287
No 31 Disguises of idleness Sobers character
290
No 32 Sleep
293
No 36 The terrifick diction
297
No 41 On the death of a friend
300
No 44 Use of memory
304
No 48 The bustles of idleness
307
No 49 Marvels journey
310
No 50 Marvel paralleled
313
No 51 Domestick greatness unattainable
316
No 57 Character of Sophron the prudent
320
No 58 Expectations of pleasures frustrated
323
No 59 Books fall into neglect
326
No 6o Minim the critick
328
No 61 Minim the critick
333
No 65 Fate of posthumous works
337
No 66 Loss of ancient writings
340
No 72 Regulation of memory
343
No 84 Biography how best performed 846
349
No 94 Obstructions of learning
352
No 103 Horrour of the last
355
Index
359
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Über den Autor (1968)

Samuel Johnson was born in 1709, in Lichfield, England. The son of a bookseller, Johnson briefly attended Pembroke College, Oxford, taught school, worked for a printer, and opened a boarding academy with his wife's money before that failed. Moving to London in 1737, Johnson scratched out a living from writing. He regularly contributed articles and moral essays to journals, including the Gentleman's Magazine, the Adventurer, and the Idler, and became known for his poems and satires in imitation of Juvenal. Between 1750 and 1752, he produced the Rambler almost single-handedly. In 1755 Johnson published Dictionary of the English Language, which secured his place in contemporary literary circles. Johnson wrote Rasselas in a week in 1759, trying to earn money to visit his dying mother. He also wrote a widely-read edition of Shakespeare's plays, as well as Journey to the Western Isles of Scotland and Lives of the Poets. Johnson's writing was so thoughtful, powerful, and influential that he was considered a singular authority on all things literary. His stature attracted the attention of James Boswell, whose biography, Life of Johnson, provides much of what we know about its subject. Johnson died in 1784.

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