Reasons for a new edition of Shakespeare's works, Band 2

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Seite 16 - This manuscript is not older than the end of the seventeenth or beginning of the eighteenth century, and...
Seite 7 - O heavens ! Why does my blood thus muster to my heart, Making both it unable for itself, And dispossessing all my other parts Of necessary fitness...
Seite 48 - This royal throne of kings, this sceptred isle, This earth of majesty, this seat of Mars, This other Eden, demi-paradise, This fortress built by Nature for herself Against infection and the hand of war, This happy breed of men, this little world, This precious stone set in the silver sea...
Seite 38 - CARE-CHARMER sleep ! Sweet ease in restless misery ! The captive's liberty, and his freedom's song ! Balm of the bruised heart ! Man's chief felicity ! Brother of quiet death, when life is too too long! A comedy it is, and now an history ; What is not sleep unto the feeble mind ! It easeth him that toils and him that's sorry ; It makes the deaf to hear, to see the blind ; Ungentle sleep, thou helpest all but me ! For when I sleep my soul is vexed most.
Seite 3 - Reasons for a New Edition of Shakespeare's Works, containing Notices of the Defects of Former Impressions, and Pointing out the Lately Acquired Means of Illustrating the Plays, Poems, and Biography of the Poet.
Seite 14 - THE MERCHANT OF VENICE A LEGEND OF ITALY * * * Of the Merchant of Venice there are two 4to editions in 1600, one by Heyes and the other by Roberts. The Duke of Devonshire and Lord Francis Egerton have copies of the edition by Heyes, and they vary importantly. * * * It must be acknowledged that this is a very easy and happy emendation, which does not admit of a moment's doubt or dispute. * * * Readers in general are not...
Seite 19 - Heyes, and they vary importantly. * * * It must be acknowledged that this is a very easy and happy emendation, which does not admit of a moment's doubt or dispute. * * * Readers in general are not at all aware of the nonsense they have in many cases been accustomed to receive as the genuine text of Shakspeare ! Reasons for a New Edition of Shakspeare 's Works, by J.
Seite 16 - ... understood. * * These corrections in the margin of the printed portion of the folio, are probably as old as the reign of Charles I. Whether they were merely conjectural, or were made from original MSS. of the plays to which the individual might have had access, it is not perhaps possible to ascertain ; it has been stated, these verbal, and sometimes literal, annotations, are only found in a few of the plays in the commencement of the volume, and from what follows, it will be a matter of deep...
Seite 33 - ... tract, did we not know that only a single copy of it (as far as has been ascertained by the most diligent inquiries during the last thirty or forty years) exists in any public or private collection. Were it, therefore, of less value than it really possesses, as a curious picture of manners, towards the end of the reign of Elizabeth, and in the beginning of that of James I., we should be disposed to reprint it, in order to place it beyond the possibility of destruction.

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