The London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science

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Taylor & Francis, 1859
 

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Seite 384 - In this edition the notes are placed beneath the text, Humboldt's analytical Summaries and the passages hitherto suppressed are included, and new and comprehensive Indices are added. Travels in America. In 3 vols. Views of Nature ; or, Contemplations of the Sublime Phenomena of Creation. Translated by EC OTT* and HG BOHS.
Seite 443 - ... and human objects, was agglutinated to the roof by the infiltration of water holding lime in solution ; that subsequently, and within the human period, such a great amount of change took place in the physical configuration of the district as to have caused the cave to be washed out and emptied of its contents, excepting the floor breccia, and the patches of material cemented to the roof and since coated with additional stalagmite.
Seite 117 - This table exhibits a curious fact, viz., the high degree of hardness of cast iron as compared with that of all other metals, and although we found alloys which possessed an extraordinary degree of hardness, still none were equal to cast iron. The first series of alloys we shall give is that of copper and zinc.
Seite 309 - Ulodendrete, and the woody and vascular bundles of ferns, appear principally in the state of mineral charcoal. The outer cortical envelope of these plants, together with such portions of their wood and of herbaceous plants and foliage as were submerged without subaerial decay, occur as compact coal of various degrees of purity, the cortical matter, owing to its greater resistance to aqueous infiltration, affording the purest coal.
Seite 168 - I believe I represent the received idea of the gravitating force aright, in saying that it is a simple attractive force exerted between any two or all the particles or masses of matter, at every sensible distance, but with a strength varying inversely as the square of the distance.
Seite 309 - The outer cortical envelope of these plants, together with such portions of their wood and of herbaceous plants and foliage as were submerged without subaerial decay, occur as compact coal of various degrees of purity ; the cortical matter, owing to its greater resistance to aqueous infiltration, affording the purest coal. The relative amounts of all these substances found in the states of mineral charcoal and compact coal depend principally upon the greater or less prevalence of subaerial decay,...
Seite 167 - I perceive that I do not use the word " force " as you define it, " the tendency of a body to pass from one place to another." What I mean by the word is the source or sources of all possible actions of the particles or materials of the universe; these being often called the powers of nature when spoken of in respect of the different manners in which their effects are shown.
Seite 102 - Stokes, recently, in applying the dynamical theory of light to other classes of phenomena, found one in which the effects should differ on the two assumptions. When light is transmitted through a fine grating, it is turned aside, or diffracted, according to laws which the wave-theory has explained. Now...
Seite 292 - ... stomachs and intestines is also given. It may, in the first place, be observed that, comparing one animal with another, all the results tend to show a prominent connexion between the amount of total mineral matter and that of the nitrogenous constituents of the body ; there being a general tendency to a rise or fall in the percentage of mineral matter, with the rise or fall in that of the nitrogenous compounds. Comparing the composition of the different carcasses, it is seen that there was, in...
Seite 286 - I mean the tendency of the human mind to suppose a greater simplicity and uniformity in nature than exists there. The phenomena of polarization compel us to admit that the sensible luminous vibrations are transversal, or in the plane of the wave itself; and it was naturally supposed by Fresnel, and after him by...

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