New and Rare Beautiful-leaved Plants: Containing Illustrations and Descriptions of the Most Ornamental-foliaged Plants Not Hitherto Noticed in Any Work on the Subject

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Bell and Daldy, 1870 - 145 Seiten
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Seite 142 - That come a-swooning over hollow grounds, And wither drearily on barren moors: Dread opener of the mysterious doors Leading to universal knowledge — see, Great son of Dryope, The many that are come to pay their vows With leaves about their brows!
Seite 142 - O Hearkener to the loud clapping shears, While ever and anon to his shorn peers A ram goes bleating : Winder of...
Seite 104 - ... betray a shabby insignificance. Thus, too, with the leaves, which have burst asunder suddenly like the fan-palm to make way for the stalk, — their edges in the day-time look ragged and unfinished, as if nature had left them in a hurry for some more pleasing task. On the day after the evening when I had thought it so beautiful, I could not conceive how I had made such a mistake. " ' But the second evening I went out into the garden again. In clearest moonlight stood my flower, more beautiful...
Seite 133 - I'll tell you, friend! a wise man and a fool. You'll find, if once the monarch acts the monk, Or, cobbler-like, the parson will be drunk, Worth makes the man, and want of it, the fellow; The rest is all but leather or prunella.
Seite 104 - ... own flower. I have since had further opportunity of watching the Yuca, and verified these observations, that she will not flower till the full moon, and chooses to hide her beauty from the eye of day.
Seite 104 - Many white flowers are far more beautiful by day ; the lily, for instance, with its firm, thick leaf, needs the broadest light to manifest its purity. But these transparent leaves of greenish white, which look dull in the day, are melted by the moon to glistening silver. And not only does the plant not appear in its destined hue by day, but the flower, though, as bell-shaped, it cannot quite close again after having once expanded, yet presses its petals together as closely as it can, hangs down its...
Seite 120 - CÏPIUPEDIA, with successful guile, Knits her smooth brow, extinguishes her smile ; A spider's bloated paunch and jointed arms Hide her fine form, and mask her blushing charms; In ambush sly the mimic warrior lies, And on quick wing the panting plunderer flies.
Seite 104 - The first night I saw it in flower, I was conscious of a peculiar delight, I may even say rapture. Many white flowers are far more beautiful by day ; the lily, for instance, with its firm, thick leaf, needs the broadest light to manifest its purity. But these transparent leaves of greenish white, which look dull in the day, are melted by the moon to glistening silver. And not only does the plant not appear in its destined hue by day, but the flower, though, as bell-shaped...
Seite 104 - ... pleasing task. On the day after the evening when I had thought it so beautiful, I could not conceive how I had made such a mistake. " ' But the second evening I went out into the garden again. In clearest moonlight stood my flower, more beautiful than ever. The stalk pierced the air like a spear, all the little bells had erected themselves around it in most graceful array, with petals more transparent than silver, and of softer light than the diamond. Their edges were clearly but not sharply...
Seite 70 - YET still Alcithoe perverse remains, And Bacchus still, and all his rites, disdains. Too rash, and madly bold, she bids him prove Himself a God, nor owns the son of Jove. Her sisters too unanimous agree, Faithful associates in impiety. The Story of Alcithoe and her Sisters Be this a solemn feast, the priest had said; Be, with each mistress, unemploy'd each maid.

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