The Philosophical Transactions and Collections, to the End of the Year 1700: Containing pt. 1, The mathematical papers; pt. 2, The physiological papers; pt. 3, the anatomical papers; pt. 4, The philological and miscellaneous papers, by J. Eames and J. Martyn

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Seite 488 - ... could look bigger. Before he was couched, he expected little advantage from seeing, worth undergoing an operation for, except reading and writing; for he said, he thought he could have no more pleasure in walking abroad than he had in the garden, which he could do safely and readily.
Seite 488 - He knew not the shape of any thing, nor any one thing from another, however different in shape, or magnitude, but upon being told what things were, whose form he before knew from feeling, he would carefully observe, that he might know them again; but having too many objects to learn at once, he forgot many of them : and (as he said) at first he learned to know, and again forgot a thousand things in a day.
Seite 487 - ... the colour may. And thus it was with this young gentleman, who though he knew these colours asunder in a good light; yet when he saw them after he was couched, the faint ideas he had of them before, were not sufficient for him to know them by afterwards; and therefore, he did not think them the same which he had before known by those names.
Seite 488 - ... he could form no judgment of their shape, or guess what it was in any object that was pleasing to him. He knew not the shape of any thing, nor any one thing from another, however different in shape or magnitude : * but upon being told what things were, whose form he before knew from feeling, he would carefully observe, that he might know them again...
Seite 488 - When he first saw, he was so far from making any judgment about distances, that he thought all objects whatever touched his eyes (as he expressed it), as what he felt did his skin ; and thought no objects so agreeable as those which were smooth and regular, though he could form no judgment of their shape, or guess what it was in any object that was pleasing to him. He knew not the shape of...
Seite 488 - And even blindness he observed, had this advantage, that he could go any where in the dark much better than those who can see; and after he had seen, he did not soon lose this quality, nor desire a light to go about the house in the night.
Seite 489 - ... it; but his gratitude to his operator he could not conceal, never seeing him for some time without tears of joy in his eyes, and other marks of affection ; and if he did not happen to come at any time when he was expected, he would be so grieved, that he could not forbear crying at his disappointment.
Seite 489 - And now being lately couched of his other eye, he says, that objects at first appeared large to this eye, but not so large as they did at first to the other ; and looking upon the same object with both eyes, he thought it looked about twice as large as with the first couched eye only, but not double that we can any way discover.
Seite 488 - One particular only (though it may appear trifling) I will relate. Having often forgot which was the cat, and which the dog, he was ashamed to ask ; but catching the cat (which he knew by feeling) he was observed to look at her steadfastly, and then setting her down, said, so puss ! I shall know you another time.
Seite 489 - A year after first seeing, being carried upon Epsom Downs, and observing a large prospect, he was exceedingly delighted with it, and called it a new kind of seeing.

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