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adverting, in the last Discourse, to a delusion, which, I fear, is carrying forward thousands, and tens of thousands, to an undone eternity.

I have closed the Volume with an Appendix of Scriptural Authorities. I found that I could not easily interweave them in the texture of the Work, and have, therefore, thought fit to present them in a separate form. I look for a twofold benefit from this exhibition--first, to those more general readers, who are ignorant of the Scriptures, and of the richness and yariety which abound in them-and, secondly, to those narrow and intolerant professors, who take an alarm at the very sound and semblance of philosophy; and feel as if there was an utter irreconcilable antipathy between its lessons on the one hand, and the soundness and piety of the Bible on the other. It were well, I conceive, for our cause, that the latter could become a little more indulgent on this subject; that they gave up a portion of those ancient and hereditary prepossessions, which go so far to cramp and enthral them; that they would suffer theology to take that wide range of argu

ment and of illustration which belongs to her; and that, less sensitively jealous of any desecration being brought upon the Sabbath, or the pulpit, they would suffer her freely to announce all those truths, which either serve to protect Christianity from the contempt of science; or to protect the teachers of Christianity from those invasions, which are practised both on the sacredness of the office, and on the solitude of its devotional and intellectual labours.

I shall only add, for the information of readers at a distance, that these Discourses were chiefly delivered on the occasion of the weekday sermon that is preached in rotation by the Ministers of Glasgow.

DISCOURSE III.

ON THE EXTENT OF THE DIVINE CONDESCENSION.

Page “ Who is like unto the Lord our God, who dwelleth on

high. Who humbleth himself to behold the things
that are in heaven, and in the earth!”—Psal. cxiii.
5, 6.

94

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DISCOURSE IV.

ON THE KNOWLEDGE OF MAN'S MORAL HISTORY

IN THE DISTANT PLACES OF CREATION.

“ Which things the angels desire to look into.”—1 Pet. i. 12.

126

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DISCOURSE V.

ON THE SYMPATHY THAT IS FELT FOR MAN IN

THE DISTANT PLACES OF CREATION.

" I say unto you, that likewise joy shall be in heaven

over one sinner that repenteth, more than over
ninety and nine just persons, which need no repen-
tance."-Luke xv. 7.

160

DISCOURSE VI.

ON THE CONTEST FOR AN ASCENDENCY OVER

MAN, AMONGST THE HIGHER ORDERS OF IN

TELLIGENCE.

Page

66 And having spoiled principalities and powers, he

made a show of them openly, triumphing over
them in it." _Col. i. 15.

189

DISCOURSE VII. .

ON THE SLENDER INFLUENCE OF MERE TASTE AND

SENSIBILITY, IN MATTERS OF RELIGION.

" And lo! thou art unto them as a very lovely song of

one that hath a pleasant voice, and can play well
on an instrument; for they hear thy words, but
they do them not."-Ezek. xxxiii. 32.

216

Appendix,

257

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