On the growth of plants in closely glazed cases

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John Van Voorst, Paternoster Row, 1852 - 143 Seiten
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Seite 97 - I turned, nothing appeared but danger and difficulty. I saw myself in the midst of a vast wilderness in the depth of the rainy season, naked and alone, surrounded by savage animals, and men still more savage. I was five hundred miles from the nearest European settlement. All these circumstances crowded at once on my recollection ; and I confess, that my spirits began to fail me.
Seite 99 - Being (thought I), who planted, watered, and brought to perfection, in this obscure part of the world, a thing which appears of so small importance, look with unconcern upon the situation and sufferings of creatures formed after his own image? — surely not ! Reflections like these, would not allow me to despair. I started up, and disregarding both hunger and fatigue, travelled forwards, assured that relief was at hand ; and I was not disappointed.
Seite 17 - All these things live and remain for ever for all uses, and they are all obedient. All things are double one against another: and he hath made nothing imperfect.
Seite 98 - At this moment, painful as my reflections were, the extraordinary beauty of a small moss in fructification irresistibly caught my eye. I mention this to show from what trifling circumstances the mind will sometimes derive consolation ; for though the whole plant was not larger than the top of one of my fingers, I could not contemplate the delicate conformation of its roots, leaves, and capsula, without admiration. Can that Being...
Seite 98 - I mention this to show from what trifling circumstances the mind will sometimes derive consolation ; for, though the whole plant was not larger than the top of one of my fingers, I could not contemplate the delicate conformation of its roots, leaves, and capsules, without admiration. ' Can that Being,' thought I, ' who planted, watered, and brought to perfection, in this obscure part of the world, a thing which appears of so small importance, look with unconcern upon the situation and sufferings...
Seite 20 - T has secret charms which nothing can deface. The truth is, no other place is proper for their work. One might as well undertake to dance in a crowd, as to make good verses in the midst of noise and tumult. As well might corn as verse in cities grow; In vain the thankless glebe we plough and sow, Against th' unnatural soil in vain we strive, 'Tis not a ground in which these plants will thrive.
Seite 18 - In securing us from important mistakes in attempting what is, in itself, possible, by means either inadequate, or actually opposed, to the end in view.
Seite 18 - But if the laws of nature, on the one hand, are invincible opponents, on the other, they are irresistible auxiliaries ; and it will not be amiss if we regard them in each of those characters, and consider the great importance of a knowledge of them to mankind, — I.
Seite 11 - The meanest herb we trample In the field, Or in the garden nurture, when its leaf In Autumn dies, forebodes another Spring, And from brief slumber wakes to life again; Man wakes no more ! .. Man, peerless, valiant, wise, Once chill'd by death, sleeps hopeless in the dust, A long, unbroken, never-ending sleep.
Seite 141 - ... these, happy in the possession of some fresh-gathered flower, and in watering and tending a few pots of favourite plants, which are to her as friends, and whose flourishing progress under her tender care offers a melancholy but instructive contrast to her own decaying strength. Some mild autumn-evening her physician makes a later visit than usual — the room is faint from the exhalations of the flowers — the patient is not so well to-day — he wonders that he never noticed that mignionette...

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