The Cultivator, Band 2

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New York State Agricultural Society, 1845
 

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Seite 135 - The Fruits and Fruit Trees of America ; or, the culture, propagation, and management, in the garden and orchard, of fruit trees generally ; with descriptions of all the finest varieties of fruit, native or foreign, cultivated in the gardens of this country.
Seite 91 - Thou fool ! that which thou sowest is not quickened, except it die. And that which thou sowest, thou sowest not that body that shall be,, but bare grain, it may chance of wheat, or of some other grain. But God giveth it a body as it hath pleased him, and to every seed his own body.
Seite 81 - As for the making of knots, or figures, with divers coloured earths, that they may lie under the windows of the house on that side which the garden stands, they be but toys : you may see as good sights many times in tarts.
Seite 83 - Contrasts, again, are often admissible in woody scenery, and we would not wish to lose many of our most superb trees, because they could not be introduced in particular portions of landscape . Contrasts in trees may be so violent as to be displeasing ; as in the example of the groups of the three trees, the willow, poplar and oak ; or they may be such as to produce spirited and pleasing effects. This must be effected by planting the different divisions of trees, first, in small, leading groups, and...
Seite 291 - Take one bushel of unslaked lime and slack it with cold water; when slacked, add to it twenty pounds of Spanish whiting, seventeen pounds of salt, and twelve pounds of sugar. Strain this mixture through a wire sieve, and it will be fit for use after reducing with cold water. This is intended for the outside of buildings, or where it is exposed to the weather. In order to give a good colour, three coats are necessary on brick, and two on wood.
Seite 139 - And out of the ground made the Lord God to grow every tree that is pleasant to the sight and good for food ; the tree of life also in the midst of the garden, and the tree of knowledge of good and evil.
Seite 81 - Gardening, in its proper sense, cannot be applied to the embellishment of the smallest cottage residences in the country, its principles may be studied with advantage, even by him who has only three trees to plant for ornament; and we hope no one will think his grounds too small, to feel willing to add something to the general amount of beauty in the country.
Seite 83 - ... violent as to be displeasing ; as in the example of the groups of the three trees, the willow, poplar, and oak : or they may be such as to produce spirited and pleasing effects. This must be effected by planting the different divisions of trees, first, in small leading groups, and then by effecting a union between the groups of different character, by intermingling those of the nearest similarity into and near the groups : in -this way, by easy transitions from the drooping to the round-headed,...
Seite 81 - ... with advantage, even by him who has only three trees to plant for ornament; and we hope no one will think his grounds too small, to feel willing to add something to the general amount of beauty in the country. If the possessor of the cottage acre would embellish in accordance with propriety...
Seite 64 - Boussingault subsequently wrote, " constitute the grand laboratory of organic chemistry. They are the agents which, with carbon, hydrogen, azote, water and oxide of ammonium, slowly form the most complex substances Animals assimilate or absorb the organic substances which plants have formed. They alter them by degrees ; they destroy or decompound them. New organic substances may arise in their tissues, in their vessels ; but these are always substances of greater simplicity, more akin to the elementary...

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