Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth

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Estate of R. Buckminster Fuller, 15.07.2008 - 152 Seiten
3 Rezensionen

One of Fuller’s most popular works, Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth, is a brilliant synthesis of his world view. In this very accessible volume, Fuller investigates the great challenges facing humanity. How will humanity survive? How does automation influence individualization? How can we utilize our resources more effectively to realize our potential to end poverty in this generation? He questions the concept of specialization, calls for a design revolution of innovation, and offers advice on how to guide “spaceship earth” toward a sustainable future. 

Description by Lars Muller Publishers, courtesy of The Estate of Buckminster Fuller

 

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LibraryThing Review

Nutzerbericht  - Paulagraph - LibraryThing

This is a classic, published in 1969, first read by me back in 1970 or 1971, when we thought we would soon experience either the Dawning of the Age of Aquarius or, alternately, the Eve of Destruction ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

LibraryThing Review

Nutzerbericht  - HadriantheBlind - LibraryThing

What, forty-four years on, is the future of Spaceship Earth? Ol' Bucky does, to his credit, grasp some essential truths about our environmental position. We have limited resources, we consume too much ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

Ausgewählte Seiten

Inhalt

Abschnitt 1
59
Abschnitt 2
67
Abschnitt 3
73
Abschnitt 4
89
Abschnitt 5
98
Abschnitt 6
117
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Über den Autor (2008)

Buckminster Fuller (1895 - 1983) was an architect, engineer, geometrician, cartographer, philosopher, futurist, inventor of the famous geodesic dome, and one of the most brilliant thinkers of his time. Fuller was renowned for his comprehensive perspective on the world's problems. For more than five decades, he developed pioneering solutions reflecting his commitment to the potential of innovative design to create technology that does "more with less" and thereby improve human lives. The author of nearly 30 books, he spent much of his life traveling the world lecturing and discussing his ideas with thousands of audiences. In 1983, shortly before his death, he received the U.S. Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, with a citation acknowledging that his "contributions as a geometrician, educator, and architect-designer are benchmarks of accomplishment in their fields." After Fuller's death, a team of chemists won the Nobel Prize for discovering a new carbon molecule with a structure similar to that of a geodesic dome, they named the molecule "buckminsterfullerene"—now commonly referred to in the scientific community as the buckyball.

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