The Navajo Political Experience

Cover
Rowman & Littlefield, 2003 - 279 Seiten
The Navajo Nation is the largest of over 560 federally recognized indigenous entities in the United States today. Navajo history and politics thus serve as a model for understanding American Indian issues across the board ranging from the tribal-federal relationship to contemporary land disputes, taxation policies, and Indian gaming challenges. This revised edition of a recent text includes new census data along with a new introduction and an updated timeline of Dine political history. The text's thoroughgoing analysis of Navajo political institutions and processes is amplified by a consideration of the distinctive Navajo culture. Presented in the context of indigenous societies everywhere, the book offers a way to explore the culture of politics and the politics of culture confronted by all native peoples.
 

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Ausgewählte Seiten

Inhalt

A Nation Within a Nation
5
No Universal Legal Definition
6
A Navajo Understanding of What Constitutes a Nation
8
Theories of Race
9
The Role of Religion
11
Traditions and Historical Experiences
12
The Political Side of Navajo Identity
13
A Distinctive People
15
Limits to Navajo Government Power
109
Attempts at Government Reform
111
Conclusion
113
The Navajo Nation Legislature The Council
117
The Council and Its Delegates
118
Committees
120
How a Resolution Becomes Law
121
Factors Influencing Navajo Lawmakers
122

A Defined Land Base
16
Sovereignty
17
Tribal Sovereignty
18
The Distinctive TribalFederal Relationship
21
The Treaty Relationship
22
The Trust Relationship
25
Congressional Plenary Power in Indian Affairs
27
The US Congress and Indian Affairs
28
Congressional Committees
29
The US President and Indian Affairs
30
The US Supreme Court and Indian Affairs
32
TribalState Relations
34
Conclusion
35
Selected Readings
36
Governmental Structure Its Form and Function
39
What Is Government?
40
Why the Need for Government?
41
Who Has the Power in Government?
42
Ideology Within American Politics
43
Liberals
44
Three Principal Functions of Government
45
Executive
46
What Is Democracy?
47
Division of Governing Functions
50
Structure of the Legislature
51
Key Terms
52
Notes
53
Federal Indian Policy An Historical Overview
55
1492Colonial Era
57
18281887
58
Allotment and Assimilation 18871921
60
19211945
61
19451961
62
1961Present
63
Conclusion
65
Key Terms
66
Navajo National Government An Historical Overview
69
Dine Traditional Government
70
The Naataanii Headmen and Headwomen of Traditional Society
71
The Naachid
72
17001846
73
18461921
75
Treaty of 1868
77
Importance of the Treaties
80
19221936
83
The First Navajo Tribal Council
84
19361938
86
19401989
90
Title II Amendments 1989 to Present
94
Conclusion
97
Key Terms
98
Notes
99
The Framework of Navajo Government Today
103
Principles
104
Authority
107
Why is There a Code and Not a Constitution?
108
ReapportionmentOne NavajoOne Vote
124
Selected Readings
129
The Navajo Nation Executive The President and VicePresident
131
What is Executive Power?
132
Presidential Office and Activities
133
Vacancies
134
Key Terms
137
The Navajo Nation Judiciary The Courts
139
Historical Background of the Navajo Nation Courts
140
Navajo Nation Court Structure
141
Navajo Supreme Court
142
Other Related Institutions
143
Cause for Removal
144
Key Terms
145
Selected Readings
146
Local Governing Jurisdictions
147
Chapters
149
Townships
152
District Grazing Committees
153
OffReservation Land Boards
154
Major Irrigation Projects Farm Boards
155
Navajo Governmental Expectations
156
Conclusion
157
Interest Groups and Dine Politics From Without and Within
163
The Navajo Nation As Subject to Outside Interest Groups
164
The Navajo Nation As Subject to Inside Interest Groups
167
The Navajo Nation Acting As an Interest Group
168
Navajo Nation Washington Office
169
Selected Readings
171
The Navajo Nation and the Media
173
Navajo Nation Media Enterprises
174
MacDonald Shuts Down the Paper
176
The Radio Voice of the Navajo Nation
177
Key Terms
178
Dine Voting Elections and Campaign Finances
179
Navajo Voting
180
Navajo Election Laws
181
A Dine Policy Portfolio
187
NavajoHopi Land Disputes
188
Background of the Disputes
189
Navajos and TriballySponsored Gambling Gaming
191
Navajos Reject Gaming
193
Taxation and the Navajo Nation
195
The Power of the Navajo Nation to Tax
196
Conclusion
198
Key Terms
199
Timeline of Dine Political History
205
Chairmen Presidents of the Navajo Nation
225
Treaty Between The United States of America and The Navajo Tribe of Indians
227
Treaty Between The United States of America and The Navajo Tribe of Indians
231
Rules for the Navajo Tribal Council
241
Navajo Nation Bill of Rights
247
Resolution of the Navajo Tribal Council
251
Resolution of the Navajo Nation Council
255
Index
259
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Seite 257 - Tribal Council at a duly called meeting at Window Rock, Navajo Nation (Arizona) , at which a quorum was present and that same was passed by a vote of 55 in favor and 0 opposed, this 15th day of November, 1984.

Verweise auf dieses Buch

Diné: A History of the Navajos
Peter Iverson
Keine Leseprobe verfügbar - 2002

Über den Autor (2003)

David E. Wilkins is associate professor of American Indian studies and adjunct professor of political science and law at the University of Minnesota.

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