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the favourites of Mercury, i. e. the
lyric poets (see the foll. art.), C. 2, 17,
29; S. 2, 3, 25.
Mercürius, Yi, m., Mercury, som of Ju-
piter and Maja, messenger of the
gods, inventor of the lyre, god of
eloquence, commerce, cunning, pa-
tron of thieves, guardian of poets,
and conductor of departed souls to
the lower world, C. 1, 2, 44; C. 1, 10,
1, and 5; C. 1, 24, 18; C. 1, 30, 8; C. 2,
7, 13; C. 3, 11, 1; S. 2, 3, 68; S. 2, 6,
5, and 15.
Mèrìónes, ae, m., a Cretan, charioteer
of Idomeneus, who distinguished
himself before Troy, C. 1, 6, 15; C. 1,
15, 26.
Messälla, ae, m., M. Valerius Messalla
Corvinus, a famous Roman states-
mam, friend of Tibullus and Horace,
C. 3, 21, 7, and 9; S. 1, 6, 42; S. 1. 10,
85; A. P. 371.
IMessius, Yi, m., Cicirrhus, a Roman buf-
foon, S. 1, 5, 52, and 54.
JMetaurum flumen, poetic. for Metaurus,
a river in Umbria, where Hasdrubal,
brother of Hannibal, was defeated in
B. c. 207; still called Metaro, C. 4, 4,
38.
Métella, ae, f., Caecilia, wife of P. Cor-
nelius Lentulus Spinther, S. 2, 3, 239.
Métellus, i, m., I. Q. Caecilius Metellus
Celer, consul with L. Afranius in
r>. c. 60, when Caesar, Pompey, and
Crassus, formed the first union
which might be considered as the
germ of the civil wars, C. 2, 1, 1.
II. Metellus Macedonicus, the poli-
tical opponent of Scipio, and there-
fore satirized by Lucilius, S. 2, 1, 67.
Méthymnaeus, a, um, adj., Methymnaean,
of Methymna, a town of Lesbos, fa-
mous for its wine, S. 2, 8, 50.
Mìlétus, i, f., the rich capital of Ionia,
birthplace of Thales, and famous for
its wool, Ep. 1, 17, 30.
Milönius, Yi, m., a buffoom in the time
of Horace, S. 2, 1, 24.
Afìmas, antis, m., one ofthe Giants, C. 3,
4, 53.
IMimnermus, i, m., of Colophon, a
writer of elegies, contemporary with
Croesus, Ep. 1, 6, 65; Ep. 2, 2, 101.
AMìnerva, ae, f., a deity of ancient
Italy, identified with the Greek Pal-
las Athene, the goddess of wisdom,

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musician of Thrace, son of king
Oeagrus and the Muse Calliope, hus-
band of Eurydice, C. 1, 12, 8; C. 1, 24,
13; A. P. 392.

Osci, örum, m., a people of Campania,
famous for their buffoonery, S. 1, 5,
54.

δsiris, is, and idis, m., the tutelary
deity of Egypt and the Nile, hus-
band of Isis, Ep. 1, 17, 60.

ûtho, Ünis, m., L. Roscius, tribune of
the people in b. c. 67, whose law
appropriated to the knights the ex-
clusive right of sitting in the theatre
and amphitheatre immediately be-
hind the orchestra, where the senate
sat, Epod. 4, 16.

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namely, Clotho, Lachesis, and Atro-
pos. In sing. Parca, ome of the
Fates, C. 2, 3, 15; C. 2, 6, 9; C. 2, 16,
39; C. 2, 17, 16; Carm. Sec. 25; Epod.
13, 15.
Päris, Idis, m., the famous son of
Priam, who carried off Helen and
caused the Trojan war, in which he
was killed by an arrow from the bow
of Philoctetes, C. 1, 15, 1; C. 3, 3, 19,
26, and 40; C. 4, 9, 13; Ep. 1, 2, 6,
and 10.
Pärius, a, um, adj., Parian, of the island
Paros in the Aegeam Sea, celebrated
for its white marble, C. 1, 19, 6; Ep.
1, 19, 23.
Parrhäsius, Yi, m., a famous painter
born at Ephesus, rival of Zeuxis;
he flourished B. c. 400 at Athens, C.4,
8, 6.
Parthi, örum, and collect. Parthus, i,
*m., the Parthians, a warlike Scy-
thian people, in the large country of
Parthia (the modern Khorasan), C. 1,
12, 53; C. 1, 19, 12; C. 2, 13, 18; C. 3,
2, 3; C. 4, 5, 25; C. 4, 15, 7; Epod. 7,
9; S. 2, 1, 15; S. 2, 5, 62; Ep. 1, 18, 56;
Ep. 2, 1, 112, and 256.
Pätäreus (trissyll.) êi, m., epithet of
Apollo, from Pátára (orum, n.), a
sea-town of Lycia, where he had am
oracle, C. 3, 4, 64.
Paulus (also written Paullus), i, m..
I. L. Aemilius Paulus (Paullus), the
famous Roman general, who fell in the
battle ofCannae, C. 1, 12, 88. II. Pau-
lus (Paullus) Maximus, son of Paulus
Pabius Maximus, friend of the em-
peror Augustus, C. 4, 1, 10, and 15.
Pausiäcus, a, um, adj., of Pausias, a
famous Greek painter, a native of
Sicyon, and contemporary of Apelles,
S. 2, 7, 95.
Aëdanus, a, um, adj., of Pedum, a town
of Latium, between Tibur, Praeneste,
Tusculum, and Rome, now Gallicano,
Ep. 1, 4, 2.
Pédius, ii, m., Pedius Poplicóla, son of
the elder Messala Corvinus, and
adopted by Q. Pedius Poplicola, great
nephew of Julius Caesar and one of
his heirs, S. 1, 10, 28, and 85.
Pëgäsus, i, m., the winged horse of the
Muses; according to fable, it sprang
from the blood of Medusa. Belle-
rophon mounted it, and overcame

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