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Tu, quum parentis regna per arduum
Cohors Gigantum scanderet impia,
Rhoetum retorsisti leonis
Unguibus horribilique malâ;

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In these lines, addressed to Maecenas, Horace foretells the permanence and umiversality of his fame, and describes himself as already undergoing transformation into a swam on the wing for a higher region tham any to be found on earth.

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CARM. 20.—1. non tenui, some Codd.—3. terra, some Codd.—6 and 7. quem vocant, Lilecte Maecenas, Bentl. conj.

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= validâ, * strong, powerful.' 2. biformis, as changed into a swam. 4. invidiâ major, i. e. having overcome envy, * above the reach of envy * (comp. below C. 4, 3, 16: Et jam dente minus mordeor invido.) 5. sq. note the emphatic repetition of ^on ego—pauperum sanguis, alluding to the imputation of ignoble birth thrown upon him (comp. S. 1, 6, 45 and 46: Nunc ad me redeo libertino patre natum, quem rodunt omnes libertino patre natum). 6. quem vocas, poetic. = quem petis (comp. above C. 2, 18, 11), quem invitas, cui liber aditus ad te patet, * whom

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11. superna, someCodd.—18. notior, some Codd.; tutior, Bentl conj.—20. Hiber,Codd.

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Dated variously from A.U.C. 726 to 736. Horace commends the practical wisdom which consists in a proper estimate of the various objects of human pursuit, and in a judicious use of the short term of existence allotted to man, amó proiiounces himself happy, inasmuch as he has attained all the ends of his

ambition, and seeks nothing more.

ODI profanum vulgus et arceo.
Favete linguis: carmina non prius
Audita musarum sacerdos
Virginibus puerisque canto.

Regum timendorum in proprios greges, 5
Reges in ipsos imperium est Jovis,
Clari Giganteo triumpho,
Cuncta supercilio moventis.

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Est ut viro vir latius ordinet

Arbusta sulcis, hic generosior

10

Descendat in campum petitor,
Moribus hic meliorque famâ

Contendat, illi turba clientium
Sit major: aequâ lege necessitas -

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VARIoUs READINGS.—CARM. 1.—9. esto ut, Bentl. conj.—17. districtus, some Codd.

9. est ut, the Greek ἐστιν, όπως = accidit ut, * it comes to pass that,' i. e. * although it happens that,' with the apodosis : (tamen) aequâ lege, &c. — viro, comp. ablat.—vir, corresponding with the foll. hic...hic...illi, * the one... the other.' 10. arbusta, here esp. = vineas, * that one may arrange vines in regular rows to a larger extent tham another '—gene*rosior = genere nobilior, of higher extraction. 11. Campum, i. e. the Plain of Mars, where the people had formerly assembled for elections; the expression * descendat' refers to its lower situation on the Tiber. 13. contendat, * vies' (with this competitor). 14. Wecessitas, here personified as

above C. 1, 35, 17, the Greek 'Aváyxm or Eiuapuévm. 16. beautiful image, comp. above C. 2, 3, 26: Omnium versatur urna serius ocius sors exitura. 17. dcstrictus ensis, alluding to the we!1-known story of Dionysius and Damocles. 18. Siculae, i. e. the most exquisite, the most splendid, asthose of Dionysius were. 19. elaborabunt, a very expressive word (both on account of its meaning and its prosodic measure) = summo labore parabunt, * will work out, will produce.' 21. sq., the genitive agrestium viro^rum belongs to lenis somnus as well as to humiles domos (= casas, tuguria)— non fastidit, * does mot despise.'

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