The History of Modern Europe: with an Account of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire: And a View of the Progress of Society from the Rise of the Modern Kingdoms to the Peace of Paris, in 1763; in a Series of Letters from a Nobleman to His Son

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Longman, Rees, & Company, 1837

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Violent death of the regent Murray
51
Conspiracy for the relief of the queen of Scots
57
LETTER LXX
63
He turns his arms against the island of Cyprus
66
PAGE
77
ibid The United Provinces offer their sovereignty to Henry 111 of France ibid
84
Philip II makes extraordinary preparations for invading England ibid
91
Queen Elizabeth sends him fresh succours
99
Henry retakes Amiens
105
Siege of Ostend
111
Defeat of the Tartars
115
The earl of Essex is sent against
119
The duke of Alva repulsed before Alcmaer petitions to be recalled
134
He obliges Spinola to relinquish the siege of BergenopZoom
140
Success of John Basilowitz I over those barbarians
153
The weight of the war devolves upon the Swedes and their French allies
165
The confederates begin the next campaign with vigour
169
Ferdinand is in danger of being made prisoner by the French and Swedes
176
Torstenson proposes to lay siege to Prague
192
The elector of Bavaria renounces his new alliance with France
193
Writ of Quo Warranto issued against the city of London and its charter
196
FROM THE PEACE OF WESTPHALIA IN 1648 TO THE PEACE
197
Reign of John Basilowitz II
207
Somerset and his countess are found guilty but James pardons them
215
Reign of Christian III
217
The Scots are greatly disgusted at the obtrusion of certain ceremonies
221
Charter restored under certain restrictions
223
The commons frame a remonstrance to that purport and against
227
Death and character of James I
235
The Spanish troops in the Netherlands mutiny on the death of Requesens
236
Queen Elizabeth engages to support the revolted provinces
242
Many persons are thrown into prison for refusing to pay their assessments
243
Their request being refused they enter into a SOLEMN Covenant
266
The king re assembles the English parliament
282
Encroachments of the Scottish parliament on the royal perogative
285
The commons manifest by new usurpations their purpose of subverting
292
LETTER VI
306
The king dissolves the parliament in order to save his minister ibid
312

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Seite 390 - I have sought the Lord night and day, that He would rather slay me than put me upon the doing of this work.
Seite 92 - I know I have but the body of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart of a King, and of a King of England too...
Seite i - The History of Modern Europe : with a View of the Progress of Society, from the Rise of the Modern Kingdoms to the Peace of Paris, in 1763.
Seite 282 - Sir, my consent shall more acquit you herein to God than all the world can do besides. To a willing man there is no injury done, and as by God's grace I forgive all the world with a calmness and meekness of infinite contentment to my dislodging soul, so Sir, to you I can give the life of this world with all the cheerfulness imaginable, in the just acknowledgment of your exceeding favours...
Seite 346 - Let the high praises of God be in their mouth, and a twoedged sword in their hand; 7 to execute vengeance upon the heathen, and punishments upon the people; ' to bind their kings with chains, and their nobles with fetters of iron; 'to execute upon them the judgment written: this honour have all his saints.
Seite 88 - Weep not, good Melvil, there is at present great cause for rejoicing. Thou shalt this day see Mary Stewart delivered from all her cares, and such an end put to her tedious sufferings, as she has long expected. Bear witness that I die constant in my religion ; firm in my fidelity towards Scotland ; and unchanged in my affection to France. Commend me to my son. Tell him I have done nothing injurious to his kingdom, to his honour, or to his rights ; and God forgive all those who have thirsted, without...
Seite 325 - I showed him evidently," said Cromwell, " how this success might be obtained ; and only desired leave, with my own brigade of horse, to charge the king's army in their retreat: leaving it in the earl's choice, if he thought proper, to remain neuter with the rest of his forces: but, notwithstanding...
Seite 207 - I would advise you, as you tender your life, to devise some excuse to shift off your attendance at this Parliament. For God and man have concurred to punish the wickedness of this time. And think not slightly of this advertisement; but retire yourself into your country, where you may expect the event in safety. For though there be no appearance of any stir, yet, I say, they will receive a terrible blow this Parliament, and yet they shall not see who hurts them.
Seite 351 - For all which treasons and crimes this Court doth adjudge that he, the said Charles Stuart, as a tyrant, traitor, murderer, and public enemy to the good people of this nation, shall be put to death by the severing of his head from his body.
Seite 301 - Heaven upon this nation if these distractions continue. " God so deal with me and mine as all my thoughts and intentions are upright for the maintenance of the true Protestant profession, and for the observance and preservation of the laws: and I hope God will bless and assist those laws for my preservation...

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