The Library of Historic Characters and Famous Events of All Nations and All Ages, Band 3

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Ainsworth Rand Spofford, Frank Weitenkampf, John Porter Lamberton
F. Finley & Company, 1894
 

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Seite 354 - Besides, sir, we have no election. If we were base enough to desire it, it is now too late to retire from the contest. There is no retreat but in submission and slavery! Our chains are forged. Their clanking may be heard on the plains of Boston! The war is inevitable — and let it come!! I repeat it, sir, let it come!!!
Seite 354 - They tell us, Sir, that we are weak, — unable to cope with so formidable an adversary. But when shall we be stronger ? Will it be the next week, or the next year ? Will it be when we are totally disarmed, and when a British guard shall be stationed in every house...
Seite 275 - Help me, Cassius, or I sink ! ' I, as ^Eneas our great ancestor • Did from the flames of Troy upon his shoulder The old Anchises bear, so from the waves of Tiber Did I the tired Caesar.
Seite 353 - We have petitioned, we have remonstrated, we have supplicated, we have prostrated ourselves before the throne, and have implored its interposition to arrest the tyrannical hands of the ministry and parliament. Our petitions have been slighted, our remonstrances have produced additional violence and insult, our supplications have been disregarded, and we have been spurned with contempt from the foot of the throne!
Seite 286 - To-morrow is Saint Crispian ; ' Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars, And say, ' These wounds I had on Crispin's day.' Old men forget ; yet all shall be forgot, But he'll remember with advantages What feats he did that day...
Seite 288 - Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date...
Seite 276 - Brutus'! tent. Enter BRUTUS and CASSIUS. Cos. That you have wrong'd me doth appear in this : You have condemn'd and noted Lucius Pella For taking bribes here of the Sardians ; Wherein my letters, praying on his side, Because I knew the man, were slighted off. Bru. You wrong'd yourself to write in such a case. Cas. In such a time as this it is not meet That every nice offence should bear his comment.
Seite 288 - When, in disgrace with Fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries And look upon myself and curse my fate. Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possess'd, Desiring this man's art and that man's scope.
Seite 284 - Imagination of some great exploit Drives him beyond the bounds of patience. Hot. By heaven, methinks it were an easy leap, To pluck bright honour from the pale-faced moon...
Seite 280 - But, I remember, when the fight was done, When I was dry with rage, and extreme toil, Breathless and faint, leaning upon my sword, Came there a certain lord, neat, and trimly dress'd, Fresh as a bridegroom...

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