Washington University Studies, Bände 6-7

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Washington University., 1919
 

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Seite 20 - If we apply the principle for which the state of Maryland contends to the constitution generally, we shall find it capable of changing totally the character of that instrument. We shall find it capable of arresting all the measures of the government, and of prostrating it at the foot of the states.
Seite 37 - ... the Report of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue for the fiscal year ending June 30...
Seite 123 - Below a circling fence its leaves are seen, Wrinkled and keen ; No grazing cattle, through their prickly round, Can reach to wound ; But as they grow where nothing is to fear, Smooth and unarmed the pointless leaves appear.
Seite 24 - As men, whose intentions require no concealment, generally employ the words which most directly and aptly express the ideas they intend to convey, the enlightened patriots who framed our constitution, and the people who adopted it, must be understood to have employed i words in their natural sense, and to have intended what they have said.
Seite 65 - Remedy, that can be found for this extravagance: and that has been, a constant Resolution, to reject all the amplifications, digressions, and swellings of style: to return back to the primitive purity, and shortness, when men deliver'd so many things, almost in an equal number of words.
Seite 21 - If the right to impose the tax exists, it is a right which in its nature acknowledges no limits. It may be carried to any extent, within the jurisdiction of the state or corporation which imposes it, which the will of each state and corporation may prescribe.
Seite 20 - The result is a conviction that the states have no power, by taxation or otherwise, to retard, impede, burden, or in any manner control the operations of the constitutional laws enacted by Congress to carry into execution the powers vested in the general government.
Seite 21 - If the States may tax one instrument employed by the government in the execution of its powers, they may tax any and every other instrument. They may tax the mail ; they may tax the mint; they may tax patent rights; they may tax the papers of the custom-house; they may tax judicial process; they may tax all the means employed by the government, to an excess which would defeat all the ends of government. This was not intended by the American people. They did not design to make their government dependent...
Seite 47 - And as we expect a greater knowledge of human affairs and more mature judgment from an old man than from a Youth, on account of his Experience, and the. variety and number of things he has seen, heard, and meditated upon ; so we have reason to expect much greater things of our own age fif it knew but its strength and would essay and exert it) than from antiquity, since the World has grown older, and its stock has been increased and accumulated with an infinite number of experiments and observations.
Seite 66 - A string of raw facts; a little gossip and wrangle about opinions; a little classification and generalization on the mere descriptive level; a strong prejudice that we have states of -mind, and that our brain conditions them: but not a single law in the sense in which physics shows us laws, not a single proposition from which any consequence can causally be deduced. We don't even know the terms between which the elementary laws would obtain if we had them. This is no science, it is only the hope...

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