Impartial Stranger: History and Intertextuality in Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

Cover
University of Delaware Press, 1999 - 290 Seiten
The analysis of particular cases of the interplay of dramatic and fictional forms in this eighteenth-century landmark provides a perspective on theories of historical narrative as well as an illustration of the problems encountered by Enlightenment historians in finding a satisfactory literary vehicle."--BOOK JACKET.
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Inhalt

Acknowledgements
7
Introduction
9
Tropes of Transcendence
44
Pandemonium and Romance
96
The Genres of the Fact
156
Translating the Sources Dialogue or Bricolage?
195
Conclusion
248
Notes
251
Bibliography
269
Index
278
Urheberrecht

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 18 - Pecuchet, those eternal copyists, at once sublime and comic and whose profound ridiculousness indicates precisely the truth of writing, the writer can only imitate a gesture that is always anterior, never original. His only power is to mix writings, to counter the ones with the others, in such a way as never to rest on any one of them. Did he wish to express himself, he ought at least to know that the inner 'thing
Seite 17 - Writing is that neutral, composite, oblique space where our subject slips away, the negative where all identity is lost, starting with the very identity of the body writing.

Bibliografische Informationen