A Collection of Farces and Other Afterpieces: Which are Acted at the Theatres Royal, Drury-Lane, Covent-Garden, and Hay-Market. Printed Under the Authority of the Managers from the Prompt Book

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1815
 

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Seite 322 - ... yeer life, but ride horse-races. — Dinna ye think he is a cursed idiot, Mordecai 1 [ Whispering Mordecai. Mor. Um! he is well enough for a squire; ha, ha ! Groom. Madam, I am come to pay my respects to you, according to promise. Well, which of us is to be the happy man ? you know I love you — may I never win a match if I don't. Omnes. Ha, ha, ha ! Char.
Seite 315 - Sir C. I beg your pardon, Sir Archy, that is the Scotch account, which, you know, never speaks truth, because it is always partial : — but the Irish history, which must be the best, because it was written by an Irish poet of my own family, one Shemus Thurlough Shannaghan O'Brallaghan, and he says, in his chapter of genealogy, that the Scots are all Irishmen's bastards. Sir A.
Seite 316 - Sir C. Poo, poo ; Sir Archy, put up, put up — this is no proper place for such work ; consider drawing a sword is a very serious piece of business, and ought always to be 'done in private : we may be prevented here ; but if you are for a little of that fun, come your ways to the right spot, my dear. Sir A. No equivocation, Sir ! dinna ye think ye hae gotten Beau Mordecai to cope wi'.
Seite 330 - O, Sir Archy, if all the vows of friendship, honour, and eternal love, which you have so often made me, were not composed of idle breath, and deceitful ceremony, now let their truth be seen. Sir A. Madam, I am sorry to be the messenger of...
Seite 314 - You see, Sir Archy, I give him a rub ; by way of a hint about my family, because why, do "you see, Sir Theodore is my uncle, only by my moder's side, which is a little upstart family, that came in vid one Strongbow but t'other day — lord, not above six or seven hundred years ago; whereas my family, by my fader's side, are all the true...
Seite 173 - Do what you will with me, joy.' ' Daughters, be cautious and steady,' Mothers would cry out for fear ; ' Won't you take care now of Teddy— Och ! he's the divil, my dear.
Seite 128 - So then, I suppose, though he can give a joke he can't take one. 'It is apt to make him unhappy, as he always thinks it levelled at that stiffness in his manners, arising from his extreme timidity and bashfulness. Assure Peggy of the cordial affection of her intended father and your faithful friend — Francis Fainwould.
Seite 304 - The man, indeed, has something droll — something ridiculous in him: — his abominable Scots accent, his grotesque visage, almost buried in snuff, the roll of his eyes, and twist of his mouth, his strange, inhuman laugh, his tremendous periwig, and his manner altogether, indeed, has something so caricaturely risible in it, that, ha, ha, ha ! may I die, madam, if I don't always take him for a mountebank-doctor at a Dutch fair.
Seite 115 - Yes ; but my father and hers are very old friends. They were school-fellows. They've lived at a distance from one another ever since, for Plainway always hated London. But my father has often visited him, and, about a month ago, at Bristol, they made up this match. I didn't object to it, for my father says she is a very pretty girl ; and, besides, the girls in London don't treat me with proper respect, by any means.
Seite 332 - ... gentlemen professed for her into scorn and ridicule ; and I suppose will cool the fervency of yours. Sir C. Sir Theodore; I assure you, I am heartily glad of her distress. Sir T. Sir! Sir C. When she was computed to have a hundred thousand pounds, I...

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