A Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland

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A. Strahan and T. Cadell in the Strand, 1785 - 384 Seiten
 

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Seite 87 - The day was calm, the air soft, and all was rudeness, silence and solitude. Before me, and on either side, were high hills, which by hindering the eye from ranging, forced the mind to find entertainment for itself. Whether I spent the hour well I know not ; for here I first conceived the thought of this narration.
Seite 8 - Beatoun is said to have had workmen employed in improving its fortifications, at the time when he was murdered by the ruffians of reformation, in the manner of which Knox has given what he himself calls a merry narrative.
Seite 347 - Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses ; whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings. Far from me and from my friends be such frigid philosophy, as may conduct us indifferent and unmoved over any ground which has been dignified by wisdom, bravery, or virtue. That man is little to be envied, whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow warmer among the...
Seite 193 - Length of life is distributed impartially to very different modes of life in very different climates; and the mountains have no greater examples of age and health than the Lowlands, where I...
Seite 106 - Out of one of the beds on which we were to repose started up, at our entrance, a man black as a Cyclops from the forge.
Seite 274 - It would be easy to shew it if he had it ; but whence could it be had? It is too long to be remembered, and the language formerly had nothing written. He has...
Seite 254 - Hebrides implies only the local frequency of a power which is no where totally unknown ; and that where we are unable to decide by antecedent reason, we must be content to yield to the force of testimony.
Seite 44 - These diminutive observations seem to take away something from the dignity of writing, and therefore are never communicated but with hesitation, and a little fear of abasement and contempt. But it must be remembered, that life consists not of a series of illustrious actions, or elegant enjoyments; the greater part of our time passes in compliance with necessities, in the performance of daily duties, in the removal of small inconveniences...
Seite 149 - Raasay has little that can detain a traveller, except the laird and his family ; but their power wants no auxiliaries. Such a seat of hospitality, amidst the winds and waters, fills the imagination with a delightful contrariety of images. Without is the rough ocean and the rocky land, the beating billows and the howling storm : within is plenty and elegance, beauty and gaiety, the song and the dance.
Seite 251 - That they should often see death is to be expected ; because death is an event frequent and important. But they see likewise more pleasing incidents. A gentleman told me, that when he had once gone far from his own island, one of his labouring servants predicted his return, and described the livery of his attendant, which he had never worn at home ; and which had been, without any previous design, occasionally given him.

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