A History of Hindu Civilisation During British Rule, Band 3

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Seite 48 - And it is our further will that, so far as may be, our subjects, of whatever race or creed, be freely and impartially admitted to offices in our service, the duties of which they may be qualified, by their education, ability, and integrity duly to discharge.
Seite 47 - We hold Ourselves bound to the Natives of Our Indian Territories by the same obligations of Duty which bind Us to all Our other Subjects ; and those Obligations, by the Blessing of Almighty God, We shall faithfully and conscientiously fulfil.
Seite 174 - Council is of opinion that the great object of the British Government ought to be the promotion of European literature and science among the natives of India, and that all the funds appropriated for the purpose of education would be best employed on English education alone.
Seite 166 - We now find that the Government are establishing a Sanskrit School under Hindoo Pundits to impart such knowledge as is already current in India. This seminary (similar in character to those which existed in Europe before the time of Lord Bacon) can only be expected to load the minds of youth with grammatical niceties and metaphysical distinctions of little or no practicable use to the possessors or to society.
Seite 173 - We must at present do our best to form a class who may be interpreters between us and the millions whom we govern ; a class of persons Indian in blood and colour, but English in taste, in opinions, in morals, and in intellect.
Seite 171 - ... a sum of not less than one lac of rupees in each year shall be set apart and applied to the revival and improvement of literature, and the encouragement of the learned natives of India, and for the introduction and promotion of a knowledge of the sciences among the inhabitants of the British territories in India...
Seite 32 - We can only say, folly is an illness for foreign. which there is no medicine, and the Hindus believe that there is no country but theirs, no nation like theirs, no kings like theirs, no religion like theirs, no science like theirs. They are haughty, foolishly vain, self-conceited, and stolid. They are by nature niggardly in communicating that which they know, and they take the greatest possible care to withhold it from men of another caste among their own people, still much more, of course, from...
Seite 174 - But it is not the intention of His Lordship in Council to abolish any college or school of native learning, while the native population shall appear to be inclined to avail themselves of the advantages which it affords, and His Lordship in Council directs that all the existing professors and students at all the institutions under the superintendence of the Committee shall continue to receive their stipends.
Seite 46 - The meaning of the enactment we take to be that there shall be no governing caste in British India, that, •whatever other tests of qualification may be adopted, distinctions of race or religion shall not be of the number...
Seite ix - The day will come, and perhaps is not far distant, when the European observer will look round to see the globe girdled with a continuous zone of the black and yellow races, no longer too weak for aggression or under tutelage, but independent, or practically so, in government, monopolising the trade of their own regions, and circumscribing the industry of the European...

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