The Poetical Works of Alexander Pope: With His Last Corrections, Additions, and Improvements, Band 3

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Seite 8 - HAPPY the man whose wish and care A few paternal acres bound, Content to breathe his native air, In his own ground ; Whose herds with milk, whose fields with bread, Whose flocks supply him with attire ; Whose trees in Summer yield him shade, In Winter fire.
Seite 35 - In vain thy reason finer webs shall draw, Entangle Justice in her net of law, And right, too rigid, harden into wrong; Still for the strong too weak, the weak too strong.
Seite 36 - Th' enormous faith of many made for one ; That proud exception to all Nature's laws, T" invert the world, and counterwork its cause ? Force first made conquest, and that conquest law...
Seite 30 - Look round our world; behold the chain of love Combining all below and all above. See plastic nature working to this end, The single atoms each to other tend, Attract, attracted to, the next in place, Form'd and impell'd its neighbour to embrace.
Seite 33 - Who calls the council, states the certain day ? Who forms the phalanx, and who points the way ? III.
Seite 27 - Ask where's the North? at York, 'tis on the Tweed; In Scotland, at the Orcades ; and there, At Greenland, Zembla, or the Lord knows where.
Seite 25 - As man, perhaps, the moment of his breath Receives the lurking principle of death; The young disease, that must subdue at length, Grows with his growth, and strengthens with his strength; So, cast and mingled with his very frame.
Seite 27 - Fools ! who from hence into the notion fall, That vice or virtue there is none at all. If white and black blend, soften, and unite A thousand ways, is there no black or white?
Seite 65 - A poet, blest beyond the poet's fate, Whom Heaven kept sacred from the Proud and Great : Foe to loud praise, and friend to learned ease, Content with science in the vale of peace. Calmly he look'd on either life ; and here Saw nothing to regret, or there to fear ; From Nature's temperate feast rose satisfied, Thank'd Heaven that he had liv'd, and that he died.
Seite 190 - This piece was received with greater applause than was ever known. Besides being acted in London sixtythree days without interruption, and renewed the next season with equal applause, it spread into all the great towns of England; was played in many places to the thirtieth and fortieth time ; at Bath and Bristol fifty, &c.

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