Elements of Glass and Glass Making

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Glass and pottery publishing Company, 1899 - 174 Seiten

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Seite 1 - Yet by some such fortuitous liquefaction was mankind taught to procure a body at once in a high degree solid and transparent, which might admit the light of the sun, and exclude the violence of the wind ; which might extend the sight of the philosopher to new ranges of existence, and charm him at one time with the unbounded extent of the material creation, and at another with the endless subordination of animal life ; and, what is yet of more importance, might supply the decays of nature, and succour...
Seite 1 - Who, when he saw the first sand or ashes, by a casual intenseness of heat, melted into a metalline form, rugged with excrescences, and clouded with impurities, would have imagined, that in this shapeless lump lay concealed so many conveniences of life, as would in time constitute a great part of the happiness of the world...
Seite 22 - It is, however, from among the ruins of ancient buildings that glass is found in all the stages of disintegration , and there is, perhaps, no material body that ceases to exist with so much grace and beauty, when it surrenders itself to time and not to disease.
Seite 2 - ... endless subordination of animal life ; and, what is yet of more importance, might supply the decays of nature, and succour old age with subsidiary sight. Thus was the first artificer in glass employed, though without his own knowledge or expectation. He was facilitating and prolonging the enjoyment of light, enlarging the avenues of science, and conferring the highest and most lasting pleasures ; he was enabling the student to contemplate nature, and the beauty to behold herself.
Seite 41 - ... easily made by exposing a known quantity of marble for about half an hour to a full white heat, by which means the carbonic acid gas is entirely expelled, so that by the loss in weight the quantity of each ingredient, supposing the marble to have been pure, is at once determined. In order to ascertain that the whole loss is owing to the escape of carbonic acid, the quantity of this gas may be determined by a comparative analysis.
Seite 61 - draft" or movement of the air because of the difference in weight between the column of hot gases in the chimney and the cold outside air.
Seite 41 - ... being inclined to one side in order to prevent the fluid from being flung out of the, vessel during the effervescence. The diminution in weight experienced by the flask and its contents, indicates the quantity of carbonic acid which has been expelled. Should the carbonate suffer a greater loss in the fire than when decomposed by an acid, it will most probably be found to contain water. This may be ascertained by heating a piece of it to redness, in a glass tube, the sides of which will be bedewed...
Seite 41 - Into a small flask containing muriatic acid diluted with two or three parts of water, a known quantity of marble is gradually added, the flask being inclined to one side in order to prevent the fluid from being flung out of the vessel during the effervescence. The diminution in weight experienced by the flask and its contents, indicates the quantity of carbonic acid which has been expelled. Should the carbonate suffer a greater loss in the fire than when decomposed by an acid, it will most probably...
Seite 7 - ... from the almost total eclipse it ad experienced and to this century most of the improved methods which have placed it once again among the .arts must be assigned. DEFINITION OF GLASS. According to Bizer4 "Glass is a transparent solid formed by the fusion of siliceous and alkaline matter, which assumed while passing through said state of fusion at a temperature sufficiently high, a fluid condition, and, as the temperature falls, passing from the fluid through a ductile viscous state to a solid,—...
Seite 65 - The thermal capacity of a gas, as of any substance, is the amount of heat necessary to raise the temperature of a unit mass of it one degree.

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