Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

GRADUATE SCHOOL

The Graduate School of the University of Pennsylvania offers a wide variety of courses in linguistic subjects covering

AMERICAN INDIAN LANGUAGES
ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE
GERMANIC LANGUAGES, INCLUDING THE SCANDINAVIAN
GREEK AND THE ANCIENT GREEK DIALECTS
INDO-EUROPEAN PHILOLOGY AND SANSKRIT
LATIN AND THE ITALIC DIALECTS
ROMANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES
SEMITIC LANGUAGES AND ARCHAEOLOGY

The University Library affords especially good facilities for linguistic study. The University Museum possesses valuable archaeological collections covering several of the above subjects.

The registration of graduate students in the academic year 1925–26 was 1621; in the Summer School of 1926 it was 456.

A Bulletin containing the list of those who have received the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, with their present addresses and the titles of their doctoral dissertations, will be available shortly. For this, and other Bulletins of the Graduate School, or additional information in regard to the linguistic or other fields of graduate work, address Dean Herman V. Ames, Graduate School, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.

15.

187

Supplement to LANGUAGE, Journal of the Linguistic Society of

America

[ocr errors]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small]

Founded 1984

OFFICERS FOR 1928
President, PROFESSOR FRANZ Boas, of Columbia University.
Vice-President, PROFESSOR G. O. CURME, of Northwestern University.
Secretary and Treasurer, PROFESSOR ROLAND G. KENT of the University of

Pennsylvania.
Executive Committee, the preceding, and

PROFESSOR LEONARD BLOOMFIELD, of the University of Chicago.
PROFESSOR FRANKLIN EDGERTON, of Yale University.
PROFESSOR EDWARD PROKOSCH, of Bryn Mawr College.

Committee on Publications:

Chairman and Editor: PROFESSOR GEORGE MELVILLE BOLLING, of the Ohio

State University. Term expiring 1928: PROFESSOR AURELIO M. ESPINOSA, Stanford University,

California. Term expiring 1929: PROFESSOR SAMUEL MOORE, University of Michigan,

Ann Arbor, Mich. To serve through 1930: PROFESSOR Hans KURATH, of the Ohio State Uni

versity.

The Linguistic Society of America was founded in December, 1924, for the ad. vancement of the scientific study of language. The Society plans to promote this aim by bringing students of language together in its meetings, and by publishing the fruits of research. It has established both a quarterly journal and a series of monographs; the latter will appear at irregular intervals, according to the material offered to the Committee on Publications and the funds available for the purpose. Members will receive both in return for the annual dues of Five Dollars.

Membership in the Society is not restricted to professed scholars in linguistics. All persons, whether men or women, who are in sympathy with the objects of the Society, are invited to give it their assistance in furthering its work. Application for membership should be made to the Secretary, Professor Roland G. Kent, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa.

Entered as Second Class Matter at the Postoffice at Baltimore, Maryland. This Journal is published quarterly by the Linguistic Society of America. Members of the Society receive it without extra charge, three dollars of the annual dues being appropriated for this purpose; to others, its price is five dollars per annum. Subscriptions and other business communications should be addressed to Language, or to Roland G. Kent, Treasurer, L. S. A., University of Penn. sylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. Manuscripts for publication should be sent to George Melville Bolling, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

STANFORD C'NIVERSITY LIBRARIES

RECORD OF THE LINGUISTIC INSTITUTE

CONDUCTED BY THE LINGUISTIC SOCIETY OF AMERICA
FIRST SESSION, JULY 9 TO AUGUST 17, 1928

DIRECTOR, E. H. STURTEVANT

CONTENTS

Mr. Sturtevant and Mr. Saleski, having obtained this approval, and in constant consultation with the Secretary of the Society, proceeded to arrange for the holding of the INSTITUTE, subject to the final decision of the Society at its meeting in December, at Cincinnati. It was obvious that no time was to be lost, since most scholars make their arrangements for the next summer early in the previous autumn, and it was already close to the opening of the academic year. The plan which had been adopted was essentially as follows:

The LINGUISTIC INSTITUTE was intended to provide for students of linguistic science facilities similar to those afforded to biologists at Wood's Hole. Scholars who wished to carry on their own researches where they would have access to the needed books, and where they could experience the stimulus of discussion with other scholars of similar interests, might find the INSTITUTE of advantage. There were to be also courses for graduate students, for high school and college teachers who felt the need of acquaintance with linguistic science or with the history of a particular language or group of languages, and for scholars who wished to familiarize themselves with more or less remote bits of linguistic territory in the most economical way. The session was to last six weeks, from July 9 to August 17, and classes were to meet for one hour on five days of the week during that period; but scholars might pursue their researches on the spot during all the summer or during any part of it.

In the putting into effect of this scheme, there were four main points of consideration: the securing of an advantageous place in which to hold the Institute; the obtaining of a corps of scholars to conduct the courses; the financing of the project; the providing of publicity to attract registrants for private research and for courses.

First, the INSTITUTE had to be held at a place with a good library in linguistic subjects, and preferably one where there was no already existing summer school or session with which the INSTITUTE would come into conflict. This problem was happily solved by the selection of Yale University, at New Haven, where no summer courses had previously been instituted. Inasmuch as one of the chief proposers of the INSTITUTE, Mr. Sturtevant, was a member of the Faculty of Yale University, he was readily able to make preliminary inquiries as to the attitude of the Yale authorities, subject to final decision after the formal approval by the Linguistic Society at Christmas time. His plan received the hearty support of the President and of other officers whom he approached, and a tentative agreement was reached under which

[ocr errors]
« ZurückWeiter »