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“A classic is something neither ancient nor modern, always new and incapable of growing old.”

- James Russell LOWELL,

THE MACMILLAN COMPANY
NEW YORK · BOSTON · CHICAGO • DALLAS

ATLANTA • SAN FRANCISCO

MACMILLAN & CO., LIMITED
LONDON · BOMBAY · CALCUTTA

MELBOURNE
THE MACMILLAN CO. OF CANADA, ITD.

TORONTO

SIXTH READER

BY

FRANKLIN T. BAKER

PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH IN TEACHERS COLLEGE
AND SUPERVISOR OF ENGLISH IN THE

HORACE MANN SCHOOL

AND

ASHLEY H. THORNDIKE

PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH IN COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

New York
THE MACMILLAN COMPANY

1919

All rights reserved

LOLLEGE

x 220

COPYRIGHT, 1917,
BY THE MACMILLAN COMPANY.

Set up and electrotyped. Published February, 1917.
Reprinted June, 1917; August, 1917.

PREFACE

This series of Readers has been prepared in the belief that the instruction in reading in the schools should be based on a selection of the classic of our literature. The pupil is introduced not only to what is excellent in itself but to what his father and mother have read before him, to what has become a valued part of the heritage of the nation and the race. All other school reading should be supplementary to this study of what is best in literature.

A classic is not necessarily something old; rather it is something so good that it never grows old. The selections in this series are EVERYDAY CLASSICS because they are stories and poems that have really become a part of our everyday thinking and feeling. The teacher will not find novelties here; but this literature that has endeared itself to so many will all be new to the child. Its vistas of history, its records of bravery and sacrifice, its sentiment and its sunshine, will be for him as new as they are wonderful and important.

The Sixth READER is a book of world-famous stories. The great poems of Greece and Rome, the Bible, the myths of Northern Europe, and the epics and romances of the Age of Chivalry are all represented. Among more modern authors are Dickens, Tennyson, Byron, Shelley, Kipling, Bryant,

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