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General Editor : WILLIAM HENRY HUDSON 1. KEATS AND HIS POETRY

By W. H. Hudson 2. JOHNSON AND GOLDSMITH AND THEIR POETRY

By W. H. Hudson 3. GRAY AND HIS POETRY

By W. H. Hudson 4. SHELLEY AND HIS POETRY By E. W. Edmunds, M.A. 5. COLERIDGE AND HIS POETRY

By Kathleen E. Royds 6. MATTHEW ARNOLD AND HIS POETRY

By Francis Bickley 7. LOWELL AND HIS POETRY By W. H. Hudson can 8. BURNS AND HIS POETRY By H. A. Kellow, M.A. at 9. SPENSER AND HIS POETRY By S. E. Winbolt, M.A. 10. MRS BROWNING AND HER POETRY

By Kathleen E. Royds II. MILTON AND HIS POETRY

By W. H. Hudson 12. SCOTT AND HIS POETRY By A. E. Morgan, B.A. at 3. ELIZABETHAN LYRISTS AND THEIR POETRY

By Amy Cruse 14. TENNYSON AND HIS POETRY

By R. Brimley Johnson, B.A. 15. BYRON AND HIS POETRY By William Dick, M.A. 16. LONGFELLOW AND HIS POETRY

By Oliphant Smeaton, M.A., F.S.A. 37. POE AND HIS POETRY

By Lewis N. Chase 18. HORACE AND HIS POETRY By J. B. Chapman, M.A. 19. POPE AND HIS POETRY By E. W. Edmunds, M.A. 20. BROWNING AND HIS POETRY By Ernest Rhys 21. WORDSWORTH AND HIS PJETRY

By W. H. Hudson 22. SCHILLER AND HIS POETRY By W. H. Hudson 23. ROSSETTI AND HIS POETRY By Mrs. F. S. Boas 24. COWPER AND HIS POETRY By James A. Roy 25. MARLOWE AND HIS POETRY By John H. Ingram m 26. CHAUCER AND HIS POETRY

By E. W. Edmunds, M.A. 27. WALT WHITMAN AND HIS POETRY

By H. B. Binns 28. CHATTERTON AND HIS POETRY

By John H. Ingram 29. WHITTIER AND HIS POETRY By W. H. Hudson 30, VICTOR HUGO AND HIS POETRY

By W. H, Hudson
Other Volumes in active preparation

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WILLIAM HENRY HUDSON
Author of "France : The Nation and its Develop-
ment” An Introduction to the Study of
Literature” etc. Late Staff-Lecturer in Litera-
ture to the University Extension Board of the

University of London

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GENERAL PREFACE

A

1954 RAVEN BOOKS HCP 304 ENOL 157

GLANCE through the pages of this little

book will suffice to disclose the general

plan of the series of which it forms a part. Only a few words of explanation, therefore, will be necessary.

The point of departure is the undeniable fact that with the vast majority of young students of literature a living interest in the work of any poet can best be aroused, and an intelligent appreciation of it secured, when it is immediately associated with the character and career of the poet himself. The cases are indeed few and far between in which much fresh light will not be thrown upon a poem by some knowledge of the personality of the writer, while it will often be found that the most direct-perhaps even the only-way to the heart of its meaning lies through a consideration of the circumstances in which it had its birth. The purely æsthetic critic may possibly object that a poem should be regarded simply as a self-contained and detached piece of art, having no personal affiliations or bearings. Of the validity of this as an abstract principle nothing need now be said. The fact remains that, in the earlier stages of study at any rate, poetry is most valued and loved when it is made to seem most human and vital ; and the human and vital interest of poetry can be most surely brought home to the reader by the biographical method of interpretation.

18 OCTOBER

This is to some extent recognised by writers of histories and text-books of literature, and by editors of selections from the works of our poets; for place is always given by them to a certain amount of biographical material. But in the histories and text-books the biography of a given writer stands by itself, and his work has to be sought elsewhere, the student being left to make the connection for himself ; while even in our current editions of selections there is little systematic attempt to link biography, step by step, with production.

This brings us at once to the chief purpose of the present series. In this, biography and production will be considered together and in intimate association. In other words, an endeavour will be made to interest the reader in he lives and personalities of the poets dealt with, and at the same time to use biography as an introduction and key to their writings.

Each volume will therefore contain the lifestory of the poet who forms its subject. In this, attention will be specially directed to his personality as it expressed itself in his poetry, and to the influences and conditions which counted most as formative factors in the growth of his genius. This biographical study will be used as a setting for a selection, as large as space will permit, of his representative poems. Such poems, where possible, will be reproduced in full, and care will be taken to bring out their connection with his character, his circumstances, and the movement of his mind. Then, in

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