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But

grave Epistles, bringing Vice to light, 150 Such as a King might read, a Bishop write, Such as Sir ROBERT would approve

F. Indeed ? The Cafe is alter'd-you may then proceed ; • In such a cause the Plaintiff will be hiss'd, 155 My Lords the Judges laugh, and you're dismiss’d.

NOTES.

At the time this poem was written, there was a great outcry by the Opposition against the “Standing Army:” Hence Pope's oblique Satire, “ Save but our Army !”

In a debate on this subject in the House of Commons, Lord Hervey said, “ The reduction of the army was always the occasion of some machination against us. In the late King's reign, the small number of forces was the cause of the Rebellion in 1715. When that disturbance was quelled, the army was no sooner reduced, but we were threatened with insurrection at home, and invasion from Spain.” He added, “ Though every thing be now quiet, yet the libels that are every day published against the Government, and the many scribblers employed to fow diffenfion and disaffection, is an evident sign that we have many enemies in our bosom, who would probably think of other weapons than the pen,

if should make a great reduction in our army. Mr. Plumer, in reply, said, “ He could not see how the number of fcribblers was a sufficient reason for a itanding army; if cribbling made the Government unealy, the best way would be to employ army of scribblers to defend them.”

Parliamentary Debates for 1732. Lord Hervey's antipathy to fcribblers may be easily accounted for. What Plumer recommended, was the very system Sir Robert Walpole pursued. He had his Hoft of Scribblers, against the formidable Artillery of the Craftsman, a paper directed by Bolingbroke ; his own unshaken confidence, and manly energies in the House, against the wit of Pulteney, the eloquence of Chefterfield, and all the arts, schemes, and contrivances of Bolingbroke, н

in

we

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VOL. IV.

Opprobriis dignum laceraverit, integer ipse?
T. . Solventur risu tabulæ : tu miffus abibis.

NOTES.

But the Imitator's grave Epistles shew the fatire to be a serious re. proof, and therefore justifiable; which the integer ipse of the ori. ginal does not.

WAS BURTOS. VER. 143. F. Indeed ?] Hor.

" Solventur risu tabulæ." Some Critics tell us, it is want of Tale to put this line in the mouth of Trebatius. But our Poet confutes this censure, by thewing how well the sense of it agrees to his Friend's Character. The Lawyer is cautious and fearful; but as foon as Sir ROBERT; the Patron both of Law and Gospel, is named as approving them, he changes liis note, and, in the language of old Plouden, owns, the Cafe is alter' Now was it noi as naiural,' when Horace had given him a hint that Auguftus himself supported him, for Tre. batius, a Court Advocate, who had been long a Client to him and his uncle, to confess the Cafe was alter'd? WARBURTON.

To laugh at the folemnity of Trebatius, which throughout the Dialogue is exactly kept up, Hurace puts him off with a mere play upon words. But our important Lawyer takes no notice of the jeil, and finishes with a gravity suited to his character:

66 Solventur risu tabulæ : tu missus abibis.” . WARTON. Four lines in this Imitation “ gave great offence,” says Ruffhead, and well they might,) to two court Ladies." I he

per. fons he means were M. W. Montagu, delignated by Sappho, and Lady Deloraine, supposed to be intended by Delia. Lady M. W. Montagu requefted Lord Peterborough to expoftulate with Pope.

Pope's defence, as usual, was half subterfuge, and half falsehood. Lord Peterborouglı, in his answer to Lady M., says,

“ He (Pope ) named to me four remarkable poetesses and scribblers, Mrs. Behn, Mrs Centlivre, Mrs. Haywood, and Mrs. Manly, famous in their generation, &c assuring me that such only were the objects of his fatire. I hope this assurance will prevent further miltake, and any consequences upon fo ODD a subject.

Your Ladyship's, &c.

PETERBOROUGH."

A

But grave Epistles, bringing Vice to light, 150
Such as a King might read, a Bishop write,
Such as Sir Robert would approve-

F. Indeed?
The Case is alter'd—you may then proceed;
• In such a cause the Plaintiff will be hiss'd, 155
My Lords the Judges laugh, and you're dismiss’d.

NOTES.

At the time this Poem was written, there was a great outcry by the Opposition against the “ Standing Army:" Hence Pope's oblique Satire, “ Save but our Army !”

In a debate on this subject in the House of Commons, Lord Hervey said, “ The reduction of the army was always the occasion of some machination against us. In the late King's reign, the small number of forces was the cause of the Rebellion in 1715. When that disturbance was quelled, the army was no sooner reduced, but we were threatened with insurrection at home, and invafion from Spain.” He added, “ Though every thing be now quiet, yet the libels that are every day published against the Government, and the many fcribblers employed to fow diffenfion and disaffection, is an evident sign that we have many enemies in our bofom, who would probably think of other weapons than the pen, if we should make a great reduction in our army.

Mr. Plumer, in reply, said, " He could not see how the number of scribblers was a sufficient reason for a itanding army; if scribbling made the Government unealy, the best way would be to employ army of scribblers to defend them.”

Parliamentary Debates for 1732. Lord Hervey's antipathy to scribblers may be easily accounted for. What Plumer recommended, was the very fyftem Sir Robert Walpole pursued. He had his Hof of Scribblers, against the formidable Artillery of the Craftsman, a paper directed by Bolingbroke; his own unshaken confidence, and manly energies in the House, against the wit of Pulteney, the eloquence of Chesterfield, and all the arts, schemes, and contrivances of Bolingbroke,

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VOL. IV.

in the back ground ; and he had a ftanding Army, against any open attempts of the Pretender. With this policy, and with these armies, Sir Robert Walpole faved the state.

Upon the whole, this Imitation is highly polished and pointed; but the reader must smile at Pope's impartial glass, when he contemplates the picture which he, with so much complacency, has exhibited of himself,

THE SECOND SATIRE

OF THE

SECOND BOOK OF HORACE.

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