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THE

RUDIMENTS

OF

LATIN AND ENGLISH

GRAMMAR;

DESIGNED

TO FACILITATE THE STUDY OF BOTH LANGUAGES,

BY CONNECTING THEM TOGETHER.

BY ALEXANDER ADAM, L. L. D.

RECTOR OF THE HIGH SCHOOL OF EDINBURGH.

Ne qnis

Grammatice est ars, necessaria pueris, jucunda fenibus, dulcis secretorum comes, et

quæ vel sola omni studiorum genere plus habet operis quam ostentationis.
igitur tanquam parva fastidiat Grammatices elementa ; quia interiora velut sacra
hujus adeuntibus, apparebit multa rerum subtilitas, quæ noir modo rcuere ingenia
puerilia, sed exercere altissimam quoque eruditionem ac scientiam possit.

Quinctilian, i. 4, 5.

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FIRST NEW YORK, FROM THE FIFTH ENGLISH EDITION,

WITH IMPROVEMENTS.

Recommended by the University at Cambridge (Mass.), to be used by

those who are intended for that Seminary.

NEW-YORK:

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PUBLISHED BY E, DUYCKINCK, AND JAMES EASTBURN & CO.

G. Long, printer.

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there &liganth it. Nood

.

ADVERTISEMENT OF CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY.

WHEREAS the University in Cambridge for several years past has suffered much inconvenience, and the interest of letters no small detriment, from the variety of Latin and Greek Grammars used by the students, in consequence of that diversity, to which, under different instructors, they have been accụstomed in their preparatory course ; to promote, so far as may be, the cause of Literature, by preventing those evils in future, the Government of the University, on due consideration of the subject, has thought it expedient to request all instructors of Youth, who may resort to Cambridge for education, to adopt “ Adam's Latin Grammar, and the “ Gloucester Greek Grammar," with reference to such pupils, as Books singularly calculated for the improvement of students in these lan. guages. The University has no wish to recommend, much less to dictate, 10 any other institution, but only to facilitate the acquisition of Literature, by promoting uniformity within itself. These being the Grammars which will be used at this College by all classes, admitted after the present year, it seems necessary, to prevent future difficulty, by giving this public and timely notice ; for though a knowledge of the Grammar is not at present made indispensably necessary to admission into the University, yet every Scholar who may be accepted after the present Commencement without such kvowledge, will be required immediately to form a radical and intimate acquaintance with them, as no student will be permitted at the ctas. sical exercises to use any other Grammar.

Cambridge, July 7, 1799.

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PREFACE

TO THE

FOURTH EDITION.

THE compiler was first led, at an early period of life, to think of composing this Book, by observing the hurtful effects of teaching boys Grammar Rules in Latin verse, which they did not understand ; while they were ignorant, not only of the principles of that language, but also of those of their mother tongue. Experience has since afforded him the most convincing proofs of the impropriety of this practice; and his opinion has been still further confirmed by perusing the the writings of the old Grammarians, and of the most eminent among the moderns. The old Grammarians, Charisius, Diomēdes, Priscianus, Probus, Donatus, Servius, Victorinus, Augustinus, Cassiodorus, Mocrobius, Beda, Alcuinus, * &c. have no verse rules; and so in latter times, Perotte, Manutius, Erasmus, Valerius, Buchanan, Milton, &c. Nicholas Perotte was one of the chief restorers of learning in the fifteenth century. He died Archbishop of Siponto, in 1480. The compiler bas a copy of the first edition of his Grammar, printed at Brescia, anno 1474. It is composed by way of question and answer, but without any verse rules.--Soon after the invention of printing, and perhaps before, for the compiler has not been able to ascertain the precise period, the custom was introduced of expressing the principles of almost every art and science in Latin and Greek verse. The rules of Logic, and even the aphorisms of Hippocrates, were taught in this manner. Among the versifiers of Latin

Terentianus Maurus, a learned Grammarian, by birth an African, zoho is supposeil to have lived inder Trajan, and wrote in verse, trears only of poetry.

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