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W. L. R. Emmet, of Schenectady, New York, for his work on the Electric Propulsion of Ships and Prime Movers.

THE HOWARD N. POTTS MEDAL. Edward Payson Bullard, Jr., of Bridgeport, Connecticut, for the “Automatic Machine Tool."

Elmer. V. McCollum, of Baltimore, Maryland, for his paper entitled “Nutrition and Physical Efficiency,” in the JOURNAL.

Alfred O. Tate, of Cranston, Rhode Island, for his Electrolytic Process of Waterproofing Textile Fabrics.

THE EDWARD LONGSTRETH MEDAL. Leason H. Adams, of Washington, D. C., for the paper prepared in conjunction with Erskine D. Williamson, entitled “The Annealing of Glass,” in the JOURNAL

Professor J. Bergonie, of Bordeaux, France, for his Application of ElectroMagnetic Means and Apparatus to the Location of Metallic Fragments Imbedded in Muscular Tissues.

W. Barton Eddison, of Ardsley-on-Hudson, New York, for his inventions and improvements embodied in the Surface Combustion Burner.

B. H. Hite, of Morgantown, West Virginia, for his Method of Sterlization by High Pressure.

Goddank L. Kothny, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, jointly with Robert Suczek, for his inventions embodied in the Radojet Air Pump.

Jacob M. Spitzglass, of Chicago, Illinois, for his inventions embodied in the Republic Flow Meter.

Robert Suczek, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, jointly with Goddank L. Kothny for his inventions embodied in the Radojet Air Pump.

Erskine D. Williamson, of Washington, D. C., for the paper prepared in conjunction with Leason H. Adams, entitled “The Annealing of Glass," in the JOURNAL

THE CERTIFICATE OF MERIT. Eugene C. Bingham, of Easton, Pa. for the inventions and improvements embodied in the Variable Pressure Viscometer,

Joseph S. Hepburn, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, for the paper prepared in conjunction with E. Quintard St. John and Frank Morton Jones, entitled “ The Absorption of Nutrients and Allied Phenomena in the Pitchers of the Sarraceniaceæ,” in the JOURNAL.

Frank Morton Jones, of Wilmington, Delaware, for the paper prepared in conjunuction with Joseph S. Hepburn and E. Quintard St. John, entitled “The Absortion of Nutrients and Allied Phenomena in the Pitchers of the Sarraceniaceæ, in the JOURNAL.

E. Quintard St. John, of Philadelphia, Pa., for the paper prepared in conjunction with Joseph S. Hepburn and Frank M. Jones, entitled “The Absorption of Nutrients and Allied Phenomena in the Pitchers of the Sarraceniaceæ," in the JOURNAL

THE FRANKLIN INSTITUTE AWARDS

OCTOBER, 1921, TO JUNE, 1922.

THE FRANKLIN MEDAL.

TO Dr. Ralph Modjeski, of New York "in recognition of his signal achievements as a designer and builder of structures, mainly bridges, many of them epoch-marking in the history of the engineering profession, beautiful as well as useful, involving on the part of the designer vision, courage and technique of the highest order."

Sir Joseph John Thomson, of Cambridge, England,“ in recognition of the immeasurable service he has rendered to the world as teacher and leader of thought in that domain of science especially related to a fundamental knowledge of electricity and the constitution of matter."

THE HOWARD N. POTTS MEDAL.

TO

E. G. Coker, of London England, for his Method of Determining Stress by Photo-Elastic Means.

Richard B. Moore, of Washington, D. C., for his paper entitled “Helium, Its History, Properties and Commercial Development.”

Messrs. John Morris Weiss and Charles Raymond Downs, of New York, for their joint invention of the Vapor Phase Oxidation of Benzene to Maleic Acid

THE EDWARD LONGSTRETH MEDAL.

TO Samuel T. Freas, of Trenton, New Jersey, for his inventions and improvements embodied in the “ Interlocking” Tooth Saw.

James Hartness, of Springfield, Vermont, for his Screw Thread Comparator.

Thomas Willing Hicks, of Minneapolis, Minnesota, for his “OnceOver” Tiller.

Joseph F. Keller, of Brooklyn, New York, for his inventions and improvements embodied in the Automatic Die Cutting Machine.

Martin F. Tiernan, of Newark, New Jersey, jointly with Charles F. Wallace, for his inventions embodied in the Chlorinator.

Charles F. Wallace, of Newark, New Jersey, jointly with Martin F. Tiernan, for his inventions embodied in the Chlorinator.

THE CERTIFICATE OF MERIT.

TO

Rear Admiral W. H. G. Bullard, of Washington D. C., for his paper entitled “The Application of Radio to Navigation Problems."

Harry Etchells, of Sheffield, England, jointly with H. A. Greaves for his inventions and improvements embodied in the Electric Arc Furnace.

H. A. Greaves, of Sheffield, England, jointly with Harry Etchells, for his inventions and improvements embodied in the Electric Arc Furnace.

Charles E. Mendenhall, of Madison, Wisconsin, for his paper entitled “ Aeronautic Instruments."

Arthur H. Pitney, of Stamford, Connecticut, for his Postage Meter.

Walter Kidde and Company, of New York, for their improvements made on the Rich System of Detecting and Extinguishing Marine Fires.

AWARDS

1835-1922.

FRANKLIN MEDAL AWARDS.

1915-1921.

ARRHENIUS, SVANTE AUGUST.

“In recognition of his notable contributions to the theory of physical science which have found unprecedentedly extended and fruitful application in the experimental study of chemical, physical, biological and cosmic phenomena, as well as in industrial chemistry.” 1920.

Carty, John J.

In recognition of his long-continued activities in the telephone service, his important and varied contributions to the telephone art, his work in the establishment of the principles of telephone engineering, and his signal success in directing the efforts of a large staff of engineers and scientists to the accomplishment of the telephonic transmission of speech over vast distances." 1916.

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DEWAR, SIR JAMES.

' In recognition of his numerous and most important contributions
to our knowledge of physical and chemical phenomena, and his great
skill and inventive genius in attacking and solving chemical and
physical problems of the first magnitude."
1919.

EDISON, THOMAS Alva.

“In recognition of the value of numerous basic inventions and discoveries forming the foundation of world-wide industries, signally contributing to the well-being, comfort and pleasure of the human race." 1915.

FABRY, CHARLES.

“In recognition of his numerous and highly important contributions in the field of physical science, particularly the solution of optical and spectroscopical problems of fundamental importance. 1921.

LORENTZ, HENDRIK ANTOON.

"In recognition of his researches which have so largely contributed to laying on a new foundation our knowledge of the nature of light and in developing our ideas concerning the ultimate construction of matter."

1917. MARCONI, GUGLIELMO.

"In recognition of his brilliant inception and successful development of the application of magneto-electric waves to the transmission of signals and telegrams without the use of metallic conductors."

1918. MENDENHALL, THOMAS CORWIN.

"In recognition of his fruitful and indefatigable labors in physical research, particularly his contributions to our knowledge of physical constants and electrical standards.”

1918. MODJESKI, Ralph.

" In recognition of his signal achievements as a designer and a builder of structures, mainly bridges, many of them epoch-marking in the history of the engineering profession, beautiful as well as useful, involving on the part of the designer, vision, courage and technique of the highest order."

1922. ONNES, HEIKE KAMERLINGH.

"In recognition of his long-continued and indefatigable labors in lowtemperature research, which have enriched physical science, not only with a great number of new methods and ingenious devices, but also with achievements and discoveries of the first magnitude.”

1915. PARSONS, SIR CHARLES ALGERNON.

“In recognition of his epoch-making success in the development of the steam turbine, which has revolutionized the art of steam engineering, particularly in regard to the propulsion of mercantile and naval vessels and the driving of electrical generators."

1920. RICHARDS, THEODORE WILLIAM.

"In recognition of his numerous and important contributions to inorganic, physical and theoretical chemistry, and particularly his classical series of redeterminations of the atomic weights of the more important chemical elements."

1916. SPRAGUE, FRANK J.

“In recognition of his many and fundamentally important inventions and achievements in the field of electrical engineering, notably his contributions to the development of the electric motor and its application to industrial purposes, and in the art of electric traction, signally important in forming the basis of world-wide industries and promoting human welfare."

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