Report of Progress in the Beaver River District of the Bituminous Coal-fields of Western Pennsylvania, Band 51

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Board of Commissioners, 1878 - 337 Seiten
 

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Seite 28 - Butler, we never find its horizon exposed without also seeing it. It retains the same lithological features wherever seen, and these are so peculiar that it can always be recognized at a glance. This stratum is aptly described by Prof. Stevenson, in his report on the Greene and Washington district. He says, "it is dark, bluish, or greenish gray, tough, and breaks with a granular surface, much resembling that of a coarse sandstone.
Seite xliii - A very similar case of ancient erosion is found on the Conemaugh River, almost directly under the crest of the arch of the Blairsville anticlinal. It is thus described in the Report of the First Survey, Vol. II, p. 600 : " In the exposure, which is several hundred yards long, the rocks exhibit striking changes in character : thus, at one point, the shale under the sandstone is 10 feet thick, but in a few rods becomes a sandstone, which rests directly on the coal. The shales between the coal seams...
Seite i - Juniata country. FRANKLIN PL.ATT — Geologist in charge of the Survey of Clearfield, Jefferson, Cambria, Somerset, Armstrong, Blair, Ac., Ac.
Seite xlvii - ... according to the space left under the bark for their development. Though no doubt could be entertained about the relation of this organism, which was discovered in detaching the upper layer of bark of a Sigillaria, I nevertheless referred the matter to the opinion of some of my...
Seite xlv - Bowmanni, remarks, that one of his specimens might be taken for the scale of a fish or of some great Saurian. Since that time no kind of remains referable to Fungi has been seen in the coal, except one specimen found in the Anthracite measures near Pottsville, Pa. It is apparently identical with the English species and does not aflord any more light upon its nature.
Seite 82 - It struck no gas of any importance until the bottom was reached, when a very large supply was obtained. It was not so strong as the Lardintown well however. This last is in the Third sand. Just below the mill at Lardintown the Upper Freeport coal is extensively mined by Mr. John Lardin where we see the following section : (Fig. 39.) 1. Shales, ................... 5
Seite xlvi - Mountains some clay beds associated with coal wherein are intercalated shaly fragments colored in concentric zones by penetration of iron in such a way that they exactly represent the appearance of the fossils described by the English authors. The zones, about two millimeters wide, are of different hardness, and the soft white ones being more easily disintegrated, they form a series of alternately elevated and depressed concentric bands, similar to those described as characters of the Polijporites...
Seite 12 - Ohio river, and no rock foundation could be found for them at a depth of sixty feet below its present surface. No data have yet been obtained which can settle definitely the depth to which this buried channel extends, but from what is known of the ancient bed of the Big Beaver the Ohio must once have flowed considerably more than 100 feet below its present level, and possibly more than 200 feet below it. At least this is true of that portion of it below the mouth of the Big Beaver. To one carelessly...
Seite 280 - FOURTH TERRACE CLAY. XXX. Beaver Co., Pulaski T., near New Brighton, taken from the surface of the Fourth Terrace, (counting upward from the bed of the Ohio River,) on the land of Mendenhall & Chamberlin. Analysed by D. McCreath. XXXI. The same at New Brighton, and used by Elverson & Sherwood in their manufacture of plant pots. Analysed by D. McCreath. XXX. XXXI. Silica, 46.160 67.780 Alumina, 26.976 16.290 Sesquioxide of iron, 7.214 4.570 Titanic Acid, 740 .780 Lime, 2.210 .600 Magnesia, 1.520 .727...
Seite 17 - Anticlinals of the District. The rocks exposed in this district extend from the Pittsburg coal far down into the Conglomerate Series, thus giving a full view of the Lower Barren Series, the Lower Productive Coals, and about 200 feet of the massive conglomerate sandstones which lie at their base. The Pittsburg coal is confined to the summits of a few very high knobs in north Allegheny, and there are never more than 50 feet of measures above it. The Lower Barren Series covers nearly the entire surface...

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