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THE ATHENÆUM, 1857.

order has been delayed by the necessity of bringing another European regiment to Calcutta. The capital has for the last two years been left almost unprotected. Formerly there was always a European regiment in the fort and 1,200 artillerymen at Dumdum, eight miles off. The transfer of the Artillery headquarters to Meerut left only one regiment in Calcutta, and that is sometimes reduced to a wing. There are 5,000 Sepoys at Barrack pore. There is a bad spirit among some of them, and it is barely possible they may refuse to obey the order, or may display their sympathy in a manner involving a breach of discipline. In that case the fort, if not the town, would be in danger, and Government has acted wisely in providing against the possibility of resistance With two European regiments on the spot and three

batteries in reserve, the Sepoys, however excited, will obey in silence. I said the sentence was inadequate. As I write the papers bring intelligence of a mutiny among the Madras troops at Vizieragram. The Madrassees have no caste, and their discontent must, therefore, proceed from other causes than the cartridge order. The truth is, we are at this moment passing through one of those periodical crises which every now and then remind us that Government in India 'sits on bayonets.' The Sepoys are restless and dissatisfied. They have no particular grievances, no particular leaders,

no particular wants. A war on this side of India would
at once remove every disaffection."

On the 19th of May the Times, in a letter
from its Calcutta correspondent dated April 9th,
said :-

"The 19th Regiment of Native Infantry has been lichanded. The Government ordered it to march to

not do. Lord Clive endeavoured to promote social and kindly intercourse between the Sepoys and their officers. He was quite convinced that if any disaster occurred to their Eastern empire it would follow from a defection of attachment between the European officers and the native soldiers of the army of India."

It was not until the beginning of July that the full extent of the danger was realized, when the Government acted with the greatest promptitude. Sir Colin Campbell was sent out immediately, and arrangements were made for 14,000 troops to follow without delay.

The Atheneum, in reviewing a group of books

on the Mutiny on August 15th, says in reference Siege of to the siege of Delhi : "Like all the rest of Delhi.

England, we dream that Delhi may have fallen. But our knowledge of the place inspires little hope that such a consummation is nigh. All that strong hands and strong hearts can do will be done to crush the rebellious city; but since the days when a blast of trumpets threw down the walls of Jericho no military miracle has occurred more astounding than would be a

successful assault on Delhi with the troops Its noble

now under its walls......Delhi has many noble buildings. buildings worth preserving. The palace itself

ranks next to Windsor as a kingly residence. Its gateway is far handsomer than that of the

[graphic]

THE ATHENÆUM, 1857.

not do. Lord Clive endeavoured to promote
social and kindly intercourse between the Sepoys
and their officers. He was quite convinced that
if any disaster occurred to their Eastern empire
it would follow from a defection of attachment
between the European officers and the native
soldiers of the army of India.

It was not until the beginning of July that the
full extent of the danger was realized, when the
Government acted with the greatest promptitude.
Sir Colin Campbell was sent out immediately,
and arrangements were made for 14,000 troops
to follow without delay.

The Athenæum, in reviewing a group of books
on the Mutiny on August 15th, says in reference

Sind arrang thout delayeviewing a sus in reference

Great Bázár at Kábul. The throne-room is
matchless. The roof rests on massive columns
of white marble, and beautiful mosaics adorn
the hall. In the centre is the white marble dais
on which once stood the famous peacock throne.
The King's private chapel is of the whitest
marble and a perfect gem of Art. A quarter
of a mile to the west of the palace stands the
cathedral mosque, vast, massive, grand. The
atrocities of the modern rebels of Delhi call
for signal retribution ; but we are not of the
number who wish to see vengeance wreaked
indiscriminately, or who would have beautiful
edifices destroyed for the guilt of the inhabitants.
Let the people of Delhi suffer,—let the armed
mutineers be exterminated,—but let the palaces
of Delhi remain a monument of our triumph
and of our self-control.”

The "military miracle” was accomplished.
Shortly after daybreak on the morning of the
14th of September the city was stormed, and
the troops were soon in possession of the end of
the fort, with the Cashmere, Cabul, and Moree
gates; but General Wilson telegraphed at 10 A.M.,
“Our column making slow progress," and it was
not until the 20th that Delhi was completely
in our possession.

In reviewing on October 3rd 'Tracts on the
Native Army of India,' by Brigadier - General

re of to the siege of Delhi : Like all the rest of
This England, we dream that Delhi may have fallen.

But our knowledge of the place inspires little
hope that such a consummation is nigh. All
that strong hands and strong hearts can do will
be done to crush the rebellious city; but since
the days when a blast of trumpets threw down
the walls of Jericho no military miracle has
occurred more astounding than would be a
successful assault on Delhi with the troops

now under its walls......Delhi has many noble
ngs. buildings worth preserving. The palace itself

ranks next to Windsor as a kingly residence.
Its gateway is far handsomer than that of the

statesmen.

John Jacob, and 'The Rebellion in India : How to prevent Another,' by John Bruce Norton, the

Athenæum says: “When we read the recorded Warnings of opinions of Wellington, Munro, Metcalfe, ElphinIndian

stone, Malcolm, and those other illustrious men who gained or consolidated our empire in the East, we cannot but be astonished at the fullness and vividness of the prophecies of all that has now been realized...... Whatever were the internal condition of the Bengal army, the revolt would never have been so universal, so sanguinary and so disastrous, but for a combination of other circumstances, altogether foreign to the military organization of regiments. The very hesitation of the Sipáhís to rise at a time when the fatuous imprudence of our Government had left nothing undone to render revolt easy-had both lured and provoked them to rebel-proves that the mutinous spirit was hard to fan. To

make this more evident, let us glance briefly at Extraordinary the extraordinary combination of circumstances combination how of circum

10. we have been carefully preparing, as it would

really seem, to encourage an outbreak. In the first place, we had prepared and fortified for the mutineers a stronghold, stored with almost inexhaustible magazines, not only garrisoning it entirely with native troops, but actually placing there the regiments of all others which were most likely to mutiny—the 38th, which had

stances.

[graphic]

John Jacob, and 'The Rebellion in India : How
to prevent Another,' by John Bruce Norton, the

Atheneum says: “When we read the recorded
ngs of opinions of Wellington, Munro, Metcalfe, Elphin-
men, stone, Malcolm, and those other illustrious men

who gained or consolidated our empire in the East, we cannot but be astonished at the fullness and vividness of the prophecies of all that has now been realized...... Whatever were the internal condition of the Bengal army, the revolt would never have been so universal, so sanguinary and so disastrous, but for a combination of other circumstances, altogether foreign to the military organization of regiments. The very hesitation of the Sipáhís to rise at a time when the fatuous imprudence of our Government had left nothing undone to render revolt easy--had both lured and provoked them to rebel-proves

that the mutinous spirit was hard to fan. To

make this more evident, let us glance briefly at inary the extraordinary combination of circumstances con we have been carefully preparing, as it would

really seem, to encourage an outbreak. In the first place, we had prepared and fortified for the mutineers a stronghold, stored with almost inexhaustible magazines, not only garrisoning it entirely with native troops, but actually placing there the regiments of all others which were most likely to mutiny--the 38th, which had

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