The Botanic Garden: A Poem, in Two Parts. Part I. Containing The Economy of Vegetation. Part II. The Loves of the Plants. : With Philosophical Notes

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T. & J. Swords, printers to the Faculty of Physic of Columbia College, 1798 - 146 Seiten
 

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Inhalt

I
1
II
37
III
69
IV
97
V
9
VI
45
VII
69
VIII
101

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Seite 39 - But let concealment like a worm i' th' bud Feed on her damask cheek: she pin'd in thought, And with a green and yellow melancholy, She sat like Patience on a Monument, Smiling at grief.
Seite 16 - Soon shall thy arm, unconquered steam, afar Drag the slow barge or drive the rapid car ; Or, on wide-waving wings expanded, bear The flying chariot through the fields of air ; — Fair crews triumphant, leaning from above, Shall wave their fluttering kerchiefs as they move, Or warrior bands alarm the gaping crowd, And armies shrink beneath the shadowy cloud.
Seite 37 - ... that Poetry admits of but few words expressive of very abstracted ideas, whereas Prose abounds with them. And as our ideas derived from visible objects are more distinct than those derived from the objects of our other senses, the words expressive of these ideas belonging to vision make up the principal part of poetic language. That is, the Poet writes principally to the eye, the Prose-writer uses more abstracted terms.
Seite 59 - ... majestic slowness ; at intervals we thought they were coming in a very few minutes to overwhelm us; and small quantities of sand did actually more than once reach us. Again they would retreat so as to be almost out of sight, their tops reaching to the very clouds.
Seite 98 - I saw from the SE a haze come, in colour like the purple part of the rainbow, but not so compressed or thick. It did not occupy twenty yards in breadth and was about twelve feet high from the ground. It was a kind of...
Seite 83 - it is remarkable that all the diseases from drinking spirituous or fermented liquors are liable to become hereditary, even to the third generation, gradually increasing, if the cause be continued, till the family becomes extinct."* We need not endeavour to trace farther the remote causes of drunkenness.
Seite 244 - Farms wave with gold, and orchards blush between. There shall tall spires, and dome-capt towers ascend, And piers and quays their massy structures blend; While with each breeze approaching vessels glide, And northern treasures dance on every tide!
Seite 59 - Hagga, our course being due north. At one o'clock we alighted among some acacia trees at Waadi el Halboub, having gone twenty-one miles. We were here at once surprised and terrified by a sight surely one of the most magnificent in the world. In that vast expanse of desert, from W.
Seite 88 - No radiant pearl, which crested fortune wears, No gem, that twinkling hangs from beauty's ears, Not the bright stars, which night's blue arch adorn, Nor rising sun, that gilds the vernal morn — Shine with such lustre as the tear, that flows Down virtue's manly cheek, for others
Seite xiii - Many of the important operations of nature were shadowed or allegorized in the heathen mythology, as the first Cupid springing from the Egg of Night, the marriage of Cupid and Psyche, the Rape of Proserpine, the Congress of Jupiter and Juno, The Death and Resuscitation of Adonis, etc. many of which are ingeniously explained in the works of Bacon, Vol.

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