The Historical, biographical, literary, and scientific magazine, conducted by R. Bisset with the assistance of other literary gentlemen, Band 1

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Robert Bisset
 

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Seite 467 - ... flow from such a belief ; that the secret mover of this scheme, whoever he may be, intended to take advantage of the passions, while they were warmed by the recollection of past distresses, without giving time for cool...
Seite 475 - And let us with caution indulge the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion. Whatever may be conceded to the influence of refined education on minds of peculiar structure, reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle.
Seite 139 - If plagues or earthquakes break not Heaven's design, Why then a Borgia, or a Catiline? Who knows but He, whose hand the lightning forms, Who heaves old Ocean, and who wings the storms; Pours fierce ambition in a Caesar's mind, Or turns young Ammon loose to scourge mankind?
Seite 274 - The loud wind roar'd, the rain fell fast; The White Man yielded to the blast: He sat him down, beneath our tree; For weary, sad, and faint was he; And ah, no wife, or mother's care, For him, the milk or corn prepare.
Seite 58 - But all this evil arises from this one corruption of mind, that makes men resent offences against their virtue, less than those against their understanding. An author shall write as if he thought there was not one man of honour or woman of chastity in the house, and come off with applause : for an insult upon all the ten commandments with the little critics is not so bad as the breach of an unity of time and place.
Seite 467 - I was among the first who embarked in the cause of our common country; as I have never left your side one moment, but when called from you on public duty; as I have been the constant companion and witness of your distresses, and not among the last to feel and acknowledge your merits; as I have ever considered my own military reputation as inseparably connected with that of the army; as my heart has ever expanded with joy when I have heard its praises, and my indignation has arisen when the mouth...
Seite 90 - I was desirous of trying what superfluity could produce, as I had formerly made an experiment of a competency. But, in 1767, I received from Mr. Conway an invitation to be Undersecretary; and this invitation, both the character of the person, and my connections with Lord Hertford, prevented me from declining.
Seite 467 - If my conduct heretofore has not evinced to you that I have been a faithful friend to the army, my declaration of it at this time would be equally unavailing and improper. But, as I was among the first who embarked in the cause of our common country ; as I have never left your side one moment, but when called from you on public duty , as I have been the constant companion and witness of your distresses, and not among the last to feel and acknowledge your...
Seite 465 - Is this the case ? Or is it rather a country, that tramples upon your rights, disdains your cries, and insults your distresses...
Seite 488 - That a committee, in conjunction with one from the Senate, be appointed to consider on the most suitable manner of paying honor to the memory of the man, first in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his fellow-citizens.

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