Truth, Band 1

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A translation based on the Latin text of the Leonine edition.

The Quaestiones Disputatae de Veritate constitutes Aquinas's most extended treatment of any single topic. Volume I (questions 1-9) discusses the nature of truth and divine and angelic intellects. Volume II (questions 10-20) deals with truth and human intellect. Volume III (questions 21-29) investigates the operation of the will.

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Inhalt

The Mind
3
Does the mind know material things?
18
Is the image of the Trinity in the mind as it knows
30
Is it through their essence or through some likeness
47
Can one know that he has charity?
55
Can the Trinity of persons in God be known
72
The Teacher
77
Prophecy
102
Is the habit of formless faith the same as that of formed faith?
238
Is first truth the proper object of faith?
242
Can faith deal with things which are known as scientific conclusions?
247
Is it necessary for man to have faith?
252
Is it necessary to believe explicitly?
258
Is there one faith for moderns and ancients?
264
Higher and Lower Reason I Are understanding and reason different powers in man?
267
Are higher and lower reason different powers?
278

Does prophecy deal with conclusions which can
110
Does all prophetic revelation take place through
145
understanding alone higher than that which
163
Rapture ARTICLE I What is rapture?
180
Paul see God through His essence when he was enraptured?
186
Can one in this life have his understanding raised to see God through His essence without being car ried out of his senses?
190
How great an abstraction is required for our under standing to be able to see God through His essence?
198
What did the Apostle know and not know about his rapture?
203
Faith I What is belief?
207
What is faith?
213
Is faith a virtue?
221
What is the subject in which faith exists?
227
Is charity the form of faith?
230
Is formless faith a virtue?
236
Can sin exist in higher or lower reason?
287
through consent to the pleasure but without
291
Synderesis
300
Are there some in whom synderesis
311
The Knowledge of the First
338
Could Adam in the state of innocence be mistaken
367
state of innocence have had full knowledge of
374
Knowledge of the Soul after Death
383
The Knowledge of Christ
396
Does the soul of Christ know in the Word all that
409
Does the soul of Christ know all that God could
418
Aids to References 427 Aids to References
429
Glossary
456
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Über den Autor (1994)

Thomas Aquinas, the most noted philosopher of the Middle Ages, was born near Naples, Italy, to the Count of Aquino and Theodora of Naples. As a young man he determined, in spite of family opposition to enter the new Order of Saint Dominic. He did so in 1244. Thomas Aquinas was a fairly radical Aristotelian. He rejected any form of special illumination from God in ordinary intellectual knowledge. He stated that the soul is the form of the body, the body having no form independent of that provided by the soul itself. He held that the intellect was sufficient to abstract the form of a natural object from its sensory representations and thus the intellect was sufficient in itself for natural knowledge without God's special illumination. He rejected the Averroist notion that natural reason might lead individuals correctly to conclusions that would turn out false when one takes revealed doctrine into account. Aquinas wrote more than sixty important works. The Summa Theologica is considered his greatest work. It is the doctrinal foundation for all teachings of the Roman Catholic Church.

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