Speculations Literary and Philosophic

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Adam and Charles Black, 1863 - 303 Seiten
 

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Seite 49 - We conquer'd France, but felt our captive's charms, Her arts victorious triumph'd o'er our arms; Britain to soft refinements less a foe, Wit grew polite, and numbers learn'd to flow. Waller was smooth; but Dryden taught to join The varying verse, the full resounding line, The long majestic march, and energy divine: Tho...
Seite 42 - In the worst inn's worst room, with mat half hung, The floors of plaster, and the walls of dung, On once a flock-bed, but repaired with straw, With tape-tied curtains never meant to draw, The George and Garter dangling from that bed Where tawdry yellow strove with dirty red, Great Villiers lies : alas ! how changed from him That life of pleasure, and that soul of whim...
Seite 99 - I do not remember his common gait : he always entered a room in that style of affected delicacy which fashion had then made almost natural ; cJiapeaw bras between his hands, as if he wished to compress it, or under his arm ; knees bent ; and feet on tip-toe, as if afraid of a wet floor.
Seite 108 - Vice thus abused, demands a nation's care ; This calls the Church to deprecate our sin, And hurls the thunder of the laws on gin. Let modest Foster, if he will, excel Ten Metropolitans in preaching well...
Seite 117 - Herder to the English reader, is to say that he is the German Coleridge ; having the same all-grasping erudition, the same spirit of universal research, the same occasional superficiality and inaccuracy, the same indeterminateness of object, the same obscure and fanciful mysticism (schwarmerey), the same plethoric fulness of thought, the same fine sense of the beautiful — and (I think) the same incapacity for dealing with simple and austere grandeur.
Seite 216 - I know it," answered Wilhelm with a smile, and holding out his hand. "I accept it then," said she, and made a movement with her right hand, as if meaning to take hold of his: but instantly she darted it into her pocket, pulled out her dagger quick as lightning, and scored with the edge and point of it across his hand. He hastily drew it back, but the blood was already running down. "One must mark you men rather sharply, if one would have you take heed," cried she with a wild mirth, which soon passed...
Seite xiii - And e'en the child, who knows no better Than to interpret by the letter, A story of a cock and bull, Must have a most uncommon skull. It...
Seite 133 - WHATSOEVER difference there may be in our notions of the freedom, of the will metaphysically considered, it is evident that the manifestations of this will, viz., human actions, are as much under the control of universal laws of nature as any other physical phenomena.
Seite 202 - Italian flowers, pincushions, hair-skewers, rouge-pots and ribbons, books and straw-hats — all were united by a common element, powder and dust.' This is the room into which she introduces her lover : and this is by no means the worst part of the description : the last sentence is too bad for quotation, and appears to have been the joint product of Dean Swift and a German Senti mentalist. Well, but these people are not people of condition. Come we then to two women of rank ; and first for The Countess,...
Seite 99 - ... bras between his hands, as if he wished to compress it, or under his arm; knees bent; and feet on tip-toe, as if afraid of a wet floor. His dress in visiting was most usually (in summer when I most saw him) a lavender suit; the waistcoat embroidered with a little silver, or of white silk worked in the tambour; partridge silk stockings ; and gold buckles ; ruffles and frill generally lace. I remember, when a child, thinking him very much under-dressed, if at any time, except in mourning, he wore...

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