Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson: Representative Selections

Cover
American Book Company, 1934 - 422 Seiten

Im Buch

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Inhalt

To George Wythe August 13 1786
255
To James Madison December 16 1786
258
To Francis Hopkinson December 23 1786
260
To James Madison January 30 1787
262
To Madame la Comtesse de Tesse March 20 1787
269
To Peter Carr August 10 1787
272
To James Madison December 20 1787
277
From Autobiography
282
To Francis Hopkinson March 13 1789
292
From The Anas
295
Opinion against the Constitutionality of a National Bank 1791
305
To Lafayette June 16 1792
311
To the President of the United States September
312
To Phillip Mazzei April 24 1796
322
To Herbert Croft October 30 1798
323
To Elbridge Gerry January 26 1799
325
To Gideon Granger August 13 1800
330
Inauguration Address March 4 1801
332
To Henry Knox March 27 1801
337
To the Rev Isaac Story December 5 1801
338
To Benjamin Rush April 21 1803
339
From Third Annual Message October 17 1803
344
To Mrs John Adams June 13 1804
346
Second Inaugural Address March 4 1805
348
To Thomas Jefferson Randolph November 24 1808
354
To John Adams January 21 1812
363
To John Melish January 13 1813
365
To John Adams June 27 1813
370
To John Adams October 28 1813
373
To Walter Jones January 2 1814
380
To P S Dupont de Nemours April 24 1816
385
To Francis W Gilmer June 7 1816
389
To Vine Utley March 21 1819
391
To Ezra Stiles June 25 1819
393
To Timothy Pickering February 27 1821
394
To Benjamin Waterhouse June 26 1822
396
To John Adams October 12 1823
397
To the President of the United States October
399
To Roger C Weightman June 26 1826
402
NOTES TO SELECTIONS FROM HAMILTON
405
NOTES TO SELECTIONS FROM JEFFERSON
413
Urheberrecht

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 334 - If there be any among us who would wish to dissolve this Union or to change its republican form, let them stand undisturbed as monuments of the safety with which error of opinion may be tolerated where reason is left free to combat it.
Seite 203 - Nor have we been wanting in attentions to our British Brethren We have warned them...
Seite 242 - The whole commerce between master and slave is a perpetual exercise of the most boisterous passions, the most unremitting despotism on the one part, and degrading submissions on the other.
Seite 5 - Commentaries remarks, that this law of Nature being coeval with mankind, and dictated by God himself, is of course superior in obligation to any other. It is binding over all the globe, in all countries and at all times; no human laws are of any validity if contrary to this, and such of them as are valid, derive all their force, and all their validity, and all their authority, mediately and immediately, from this original...
Seite 243 - And can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are the gift of God ? That they are not to be violated but with his wrath ? Indeed I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just; that his justice cannot sleep forever...
Seite 399 - The question presented by the letters you have sent me, is the most momentous which has ever been offered to my contemplation since that of Independence. That made us a nation, this sets our compass and points the course which we are to steer through the ocean of time opening on us.
Seite 335 - ... a well-disciplined militia, our best reliance in peace, and for the first moments of war, till regulars may relieve them; the supremacy of the civil over the military authority; economy in the public expense, that labor may be lightly burdened; the honest payment of our debts, and sacred preservation of the public faith...
Seite 212 - Nothing is more certainly written in the book of fate, than that these people are to be free; nor is it less certain that the two races, equally free, cannot live in the same government.
Seite 200 - He has refused for a long time, after such dissolutions, to cause others to be elected; whereby the Legislative powers, incapable of Annihilation, have returned to the People at large for their exercise; the State remaining, in the meantime, exposed to all the dangers of invasion from without, and convulsions within.
Seite 220 - If the view from the top be painful and intolerable, that from below is delightful in an equal extreme. It is impossible for the emotions arising from the sublime to be felt beyond what they are here ; so beautiful an arch, so elevated, so light, and springing as it were up to heaven ! the rapture of the spectator is really indescribable...

Über den Autor (1934)

Alexander Hamilton was born on January 11, 1757 on the West Indian Island of Nevis. His mother died in 1769, around the same time his father went bankrupt. Hamilton joined a counting house in St. Croix where he excelled at accounting. From 1772 until 1774, he attended a grammar school in Elizabethtown, New Jersey, and went on to study at King's College. Hamilton entered the Revolutionary movement in 1774 at a public gathering in New York City with a speech urging the calling of a general meeting of the colonies. That same year, he anonymously wrote two pamphlets entitled, A Full Vindication of the Measures of Congress from the Calumnies of Their Enemies and The Farmer Refuted. When the Revolutionary War began, Hamilton joined the army and became a Captain of artillery, where he served with distinction in the battles of Long Island, White Plains, Trenton and Princeton. He was introduced to George Washington by General Nathaniel Greene with a recommendation for advancement. Washington made Hamilton his aide-de-camp and personal secretary. He resigned in 1781 after a dispute with the General, but remained in the army and commanded a New York regiment of light infantry in the Battle of Yorktown. Hamilton left the army at the end of the war, and began studying law in Albany, New York. He served in the Continental Congress in 1782-83, before returning to practice law, becoming one of the most prominent lawyers in New York City. In 1786, Hamilton participated in the Annapolis Convention and drafted the resolution that led to assembling the Constitutional Convention in 1787. He then helped to secure the ratification of the Constitution of New York with the help of John Jay and James Madison, who together wrote the collection of 85 essays which would become known as The Federalist. Hamilton wrote at least 51 of the essays. In 1789, Washington appointed him the first Secretary of the Treasury, a position at which he excelled at and gained a vast influence in domestic and foreign issues, having convinced Washington to adopt a neutral policy when war broke out in Europe in 1793. In 1794, Hamilton wrote the instructions for a diplomatic mission which would lead to the signing of Jay's Treaty. He returned to his law practice in 1795. President John Adams appointed Hamilton Inspector General of the Army at the urging of Washington. He was very much involved with the politics of the country though, and focused his attentions on the presidential race of 1800. Hamilton did not like Aaron Burr and went out of his way to make sure that he did not attain a nomination. Similarly, when Burr ran for mayor of New York, Hamilton set about to ruin his chances for that position as well. Burr provoked an argument with Hamilton to force him to duel. Hamilton accepted and the two met on July 11, 1804 at Weehawken, New Jersey. Hamilton was shot and mortally wounded and died on July 12, 1804.

Bibliografische Informationen