Bell's Edition, Bände 27-28

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Seite 70 - Then die, that she The common fate of all things rare May read in thee; How small a part of time they share, That are so wondrous sweet and fair.
Seite xxxv - There needs no more be said to extol the excellence and power of his wit, and pleasantness of his conversation, than that it was of magnitude enough to cover a world of very great faults ; that is, so to cover them, that they were not taken notice of to his reproach, viz.
Seite 112 - The seas are quiet when the winds give o'er ; So calm are we when passions are no more ; For then we know how vain it was to boast Of fleeting things so certain to be lost.
Seite xlv - Andero ;" a piece which justifies the observation made by one of his editors, that he attained, by a felicity like instinct, a style which perhaps will never be obsolete ; and that, " were we to judge only by the wording, we could not know what was wrote at twenty, and what at fourscore.
Seite 16 - WHY came I so untimely forth Into a world which, wanting thee, Could entertain us with no worth Or shadow of felicity, That time should me so far remove From that which I was born to love ? Yet, Fairest Blossom ! do not slight That age which you may know so soon : The rosy morn resigns her light And milder glory to the noon ; And then what wonders shall you do Whose dawning beauty warms us so...
Seite 21 - Ah, noble friend! with what impatience all That know thy worth, and know how prodigal Of thy great soul thou art (longing to twist Bays with that ivy which so early kiss'd Thy youthful temples), with what horror we Think on the blind events of war and thee!
Seite 150 - The beauties which adorn'd that age, The shining subjects of his rage, Hoping they should immortal prove, Rewarded with success his love. This was the generous poet's scope, And all an English pen can hope, To make the fair approve his flame, That can so far extend their fame.
Seite 98 - And every man a Polypheme Does to his Galatea seem; None may presume her faith to prove; He proffers death that proffers love.
Seite 170 - Pouring out treasure to supply his fleet; They vow with lives and fortunes to maintain Their King's eternal title to the main, And with a present to the Duke approve His valor, conduct, and his country's love.
Seite xlvii - Among other improvements, we may reckon that of his rhymes, which are always good, and very often the better for being new.

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