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LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

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PACE

Sword of Lord Lindsey

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Cottage at Radway

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Mill at Edgehill

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Map of the Country between Edgebill and Naseby 134

Chair in Lubenham Church

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Church and Market Hall, Market Harborough 136

Porch of Marston Trussell Church

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Naseby Church...

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Sulby Hedges ...

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The Clyde, near Coulter

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Map of the Course of the Clyde

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Douglas Castle...

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The Cadger's Brig

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Corra Linn

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Doorway at Craignethan Castle

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Oaks at Cadzow

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Glasgow...

To face page 153

Bothwell Bridge

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Bothwell Castle

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Dumbarton Rock

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Stamford, from Burghley Park

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Lodge at Burghley

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Front of Burghley House

To face page 161

Bridge in Burghley Park

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Map of Burghley

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Burghley Portraits

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St. Martin's, Stamford

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Ruins of Wothorpe

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Map of the Weald of Kent

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Ruins of Sissinghurst-Sissinghurst in the Six.

teenth Century

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Tunbridge Castle

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Tunbridge Wells, from Mount Ephraim

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Penshurst Church

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Pensharst Place

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Hever Castle

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Gateway of Leeds Castle

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Bala Lake

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A Welsh Peasant Woman

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Llangollen Bridge

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Ruins of Valle Crucis ...

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Plas Newydd ...

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Map of the Course of the Dee

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Wynnstay

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Pont Cysylltau...

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Bangor, on the Dee

... 200

Wrexham Church

To face page 200

Holt Castle in 1610

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The Phønix Tower

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The “Sands of Dee"

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Arms of the Russells

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Woburn Abbey, the West Front

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Lady Rachel Russell—Lord William Russell 212

The Sculpture Gallery—The Lion's Head

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Map of Woburn and the Neighbourhood

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The Mortuary Chapel and New Church, Woburn ... 217

Earl Russell

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PAGE

Entrance to Puzzle Gardens, Woburn

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Statue of the Earl of Carlisle

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Courtyard of the Castle

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The Chapel Royal, Dublin Castle

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Statue of William III.

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Map of Dublin in A.D. 1610...

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Statue of Burke --Statue of Grattan

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Burke's House, Arran Quay

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Birthplace of Moore

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Interior of the Library, Trinity College

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Crab-Fishers

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Cliffs near Whitby

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Scarborough Spa and Esplanade

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Scarborough, from the Sea

To face page 244

Scarborough Siege Pieces-Sandside, Scarborough 245

Map of the Coast from Whitby to Scarborough 247

Whitby...

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At Scarborough

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Whitby Abbey...

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Arms of the City and See of Bristol

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Bristol, from St. Augustine's Quay ... To face page 257

Ichnography of the Ancient Castle of Bristol 259

Map of Bristol and Clifton

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Bristol Cathedral, from College Green

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Norman Doorway, College Green

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Views in Bristol

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Chatterton

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Clifton College...

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Clifton Suspension Bridge

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Derwentwater and Skiddaw

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Map of Derwentwater and Neighbourhood... 276

Derwentwater, looking towards Borrowdale

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Lodore Fall

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A Glimpse of Derwentwater from Scafell

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Derwentwater, from Keswick

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The Perch Rock Light, Liverpool

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Arms of Liverpool

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Map of Liverpool

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St. George's Square

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St. George's Hall

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“Going on Board”

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Prince's Landing-stage

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In the Goree Piazzas ...

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Wapping Dock and Warehouses

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Strand Street

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Liverpool College

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The Brown Free Library and Museum

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Grafton Street ...

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Arms of the City of Dublin

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St. Patrick's Cathedral

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Monuments to Swift and Stella

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Birthplace of Dean Swift, Hoey's Court

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Christ Church Cathedral

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Strongbow's Tomb

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The Four Courts

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The Custom House, Dublin

To face page 312

Map of Dublin...

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INTRODUCTION.

N“Our Own COUNTRY” it is proposed to describe some of the most interesting and important places in Great Britain.

It is not proposed to attempt a regular topographical arrangement, because it is believed that greater interest is to be obtained by a varied distribution of subjects. Each subject will, however, be thoroughly treated, so far as space will allow, and will be fully illustrated. The places chosen for description are for the most part representative; that is, each stands as well representing the class to which it belongs. Natural scenery; great commercial cities; ancient castles, abbeys, and

manor-houses; primæval antiquities like Stonehenge; the old harbours of the country, some of which, like certain of the Cinque Ports, are famous rather for the position held by them in past ages than for their present importance, whilst others, like Plymouth or Portsmouth, have steadily increased in reputation; battle-fields, like Towton or Edgehill ; cathedrals and great churches; these are among the principal subjects to be described in “Our Own COUNTRY." There is no part of Great Britain without its own interest; and where the scenery is least attractive the district itself may have a history, or a connection with important events, sufficient to induce us to linger on the flattest plain, or to penetrate the recesses of the dreariest marshland. Thus, the remains of Crowland Abbey, which will be described in an early number of the book, lie in the heart of a country which can hardly be described as picturesque ; but whoever may wish to understand a remarkable chapter in the earlier history of England will not neglect them. They are among the most striking relics of the great monasteries of the Fenland; and the causes which led to the foundation of these monasteries in so little attractive a country are best explained by the history of Crowland.

In every case the natural features of the country will be described in connection with the site or the building which may be the special subject of the chapter; and where the subject is itself one dealing in the main with natural scenery, as the mountains of the English Lake Country or of Yorkshire, the course of such a river as the Plym or the Wye, or the wild moors and rocky coast of Western Cornwall, it will never be difficult, and will always be interesting, to trace the older history and associations of the country, and to connect them with the scene, changed as it may be, which actually lies before us. Ludlow Castle, for example, grand as is its natural position, and almost unrivalled as a great medieval fortress, becomes infinitely more impressive as we trace the long series of

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