The Literary Underground: Writers and the Totalitarian Experience, 1900-1950

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Palgrave Macmillan, 15.06.1991 - 294 Seiten
This wide-ranging interdisciplinary study explores the concept of totalitarianism in western thought from Rousseau to George Orwell, taking its examples from twentieth-century European literature.
 

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Inhalt

A Corridor of Date Clusters
21
Totalitarianism
31
Fascism
39
Communism
49
Antiutopia
75
Zamyatins We
93
From Zamyatin to Orwell
115
Diaries and Letters
145
Notes and References
261
Bibliography
275
Select Filmography
283
Urheberrecht

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Über den Autor (1991)

John Hoyles was marked by books from a young age: Huckleberry Finn (my first book from a Cardiff bookshop 1944); Hardy's Wessex novels (at my Berkshire prep school 1948, as inoculation against pessimism); War and Peace (read in boarding school courtyard 1950 - I fell in love with Natasha); Lawrence Collected Poems (forbidden texts, banned in school library, seen in mad music master's room in school tower); Shelley's Complete Poems (BEAUTY, pure and absolute from Cirencester bookshop 1952, aged 16); Urquhart's 1653 RabelaIs (Renaissance high jinks for Christmas 1953); Lady Chatterley unexpurgated (Swedish edition from Hamburg bookshop 1955, lent to 16 year old schoolgirl, never returned, another forbidden text); the Marquis de Sade's Justine (in French, in Paris, 1961, another forbidden text). In all this lurked the high and the low, symbolised for John in his inability to finish Crime and Punishment and his subjection to the samizdat porn of The Story of O while doing National Service in Bedford (1955-7).

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