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ing to Bellingeri, affect the respi- consequences will most probably ratory muscles; but respiration was ensue on their intentional removal rendered frequent and panting, by by local treatment. the section of the anterior columns. 3. “That as astringent oint

By a very delicate operation, he ments, and other applications of a divided the

grey

matter in the cen- similar nature, are found by extre of the cineritious portion. The perience to have the power of abolition of sensation was the con- speedily repelling the eruptions in sequence, while both kinds of mo- question, they should not be emtion continued perfect. In half an ployed unless their effects be hour the power of sensation return- carefully watched, and their evil ed, and became more exquisite than tendencies promptly guarded in the normal state of the sense. against. He, therefore, interposed a thin la “ The treatment of these dismina of wax between the cut ends eases, therefore, in infants,” con- · of the grey matter, immediately tinues Dr. Morton, “ should in after which, sensation again disap- every case be commenced with peared, and did not return for two purgatives, and repellent applicahours, when, having removed the tions should not be made use of wax, it again returned, but not to without due caution; such as may the same degree as in the normal be selected, being at first exstate. - Ibid.

tremely mild, and afterwards gra

dually increased in strength. If CUTANEOUS ERUPTIONS IN CHIL- the patient, during their employ

ment, should become drowsy, and Dr. Morton, physician to the sleep much, or lay his head conRoyal Metropolitan Infirmary for stantly down, a sure indication of sick children, baving frequently the commencement of affections observed inflammation of the brain of the head in infants, they should to follow the use of astringent or be immediately discontinued, and repellent applications to erup- purgatives be freely employed. tions, &c. of the skio, and parti " In cases where an eruptive cularly of the scalp, has commu- disease has attacked the scalp nicated an article to the editor of subsequent to inflammation of the the Medical and Physical Journal, brain, it will seldom be prudent with the view of inducing practi- to employ local applications at tioners to attend to the practical all, the cure being more safely cautions which he has deduced accomplished by purgatives and from the results of his extensive alteratives." experience, compressed in the In the first or inflammatory following conclusions ;

stage of an eruptive disease in 1. “That in all cases of cuta- children, whether of the scalp or neous eruptions on the heads of any other part of the surface of infants, particularly if extensive, the body, no surgeon of any expedanger may arise from their arti- rience, or indeed of common ficial repulsion.

sense, would think of applying the 2. “That in cases where erup- class of remedies termed repeltions have occurred on the scalp lents or astringents. He would, of infants, subsequent to affections of course, attend to the constituof the brain, dangerous or fatal tion, and not have recourse to a

topical application till the disease oceaşionally used by him in aid of had considerably given way to the the galvanie course.

Electricity constitutional treatment, and the is the first auxiliary mentioned as system was nearly, if not entirely, being resorted to in those cases free from inflammation. If he where a dilated and expansive inshould not have been consulted fluence and a mechanical force during the first stage, or till the are required ; and for an ample disease had advanced to a state detail of its medicinal properties, of suppuration, scurf, or ulcera, and his mode of applying this welltion, he will even then correct known active agent in various disthe state of the stomach and bow orders, the author refers to a forels, attend to the state of the sanz mer work written by him expressguiferous system, the skin, &c., ly on the subject. The other before he adopts a decisive topi- priucipal auxiliaries are various cal treatment. It is common in kinds of baths which have been children that are overfed, or found to be efficacious in promot, what is vulgarly termed of "grossing the constitutional effects of habits," to be attacked by some galvanism. Of these we shall internal inflammation, generally give a brief account in the order of the brain, the lungs, or intes, in which Mr. La Beaume has tines, on curing an eruptive dis- placed them. ease, or even one attended with The General Vaporbath, invent a puriform or purulent discharge, ed by a gentleman of great meas of the ears, nostrils, &c., by a chanical ingenuity, has been imtopical application, without pay- proved by the Honorable Basil ing due attention to the bowels, Cochrane, and lastly by Mr. La and indeed the whole system. In Beaume. Its construction is very such habits the irritation or dis- simple, and can be employed, beeased action on the surface of the ing of a portable size, either at body keeps the internal organs home or abroad, and near the healthy, and in such children, if bed, or even in the bed of the they are improperly fed, an ex. sick, without inconvenience or ternal disease is almost necessary danger. The same apparatus is to maintain a state of general frequently used as a local Vaporhealth, and when subdued by as- bath. tringent or sedative applications, The Portable Sudatory, a geneor what Dr. Morton terms repel- ral warm Airbath, applicable to lents, mischief will take place in patients at their own houses and an internal part which is most in bed, is considered by Mr. La predisposed to disorder.

B. as one of the most efficacious London Gazette of Health. remedies over introduced into

medical practice. It is particuGALVANISM, VAPORBATH, &c. larly light, and consists of atmos

In a late Number we gave an pheric air, heated by artificial analysis of that portion of Mr. La means to a given temperature, Beaume's work which exclusively and may be administered under relates to the rise, progress, and the bedclothes as the patient lies medical effects of galvanism ; we in bed in the position inost agreenow resume our observations, and able to his feelings. It is partigive some account of the remedies cularly adapted for prompt appli

cation in cases of emergency; and our author occasionally recom its beneficial effects in gout, mends topical bleeding, exercise, rheumatism, palsy, dropsy, cuta- friction, footbaths, &c. neous eruptions, &c. have been Mr. La Beaume concludes his fully ascertained by Mr. La work with quotations from variBeaume and other practitioners ous periodical publications which with decided benefit.

have acknowledged the merit of The Airpump Vaporbath unites the philosophical agents employed the effects of fomentation and the in his practice. These are highcuppingglass, on a plan more ex. ly honorable to him as testimonies tensive than hitherto devised; and of his professional abilities, and is particularly applicable to gout, we see no commendation of our rheumatism, palsy, contractions contemporaries in which we do of the muscles, cutaneous and not heartily join; for we sincerely other diseases, particularly of the wish his practice may grow lachronic kind. This construction crative to him, in proportion to is adapted to the leg or arm only; the benefit invalids may derive and its effects are mild, safe, and from it.—Lond. Gaz. of Health. efficacious, affording relief in the very worst forms of disease.

THE STOMACHPUMP. Since the high encomiums passed

Mr. J. Harrison, a respectable on this machine by Dr. Garnett general practitioner, has publishand Professor Hufeland, it has ed a case of intoxication from undergone various and important whiskey, in which Mr. Read's improvements.

Stomachpump was successfully The Local Sudatory is a porta- employed by him after a strong ble apparatus of a semioval form, solution of the sulphate of zinc sufficiently spacious to admit a had failed to excite vomiting. part or the whole of a limb, for The patient was in a state of tothe application of warm air, tal insensibility. Mr. Harrison which may be impregnated with abstracted two pounds of blood aromatics, sulphur, camphor, or " suddenly,” by opening the exany other volatile or aromatic ar- ternal jugular vein, and a vein of ticles. It is used in cases where the arm at the same time. After the Local Vaporbath and the Air. bringing up the contents of the pamp Vaporbath do not apply, and stomach by the instrument, about where a copious perspiration in a a pint, which had the smell and diseased limb is required. It is appearance of raw spirit, Mr. a powerful agent in restoring the Harrison washed out the stomach balance of circulation, by deter- with warm water, which had evimining the blood to a part in dently a very beneficial effect in which it is langaid, and generally rousing the vital powers. Blisaffords immediate ease without ters were then applied to the occasioning a general excitement nape of the neck and exterior of the system. Its construction surface of the legs. Of the prois very simple; and we believe it priety of a sudden abstraction of has been found highly advanta- à quart of blood, by opening the geous in the affections for which external jugular vein and one of Mr. La Beaume recommends it. the arm at the same time, in a Besides the above auxiliaries, case of “total insensibility from

an excessive use of whiskey,” attended with a "pulse slow, ex- BOSTON, TUESDAY, SEPT. 4, 1827. tremities cold," appears to us very questionable. Mr. Harri

The first article in this paper, on son has omitted to notice the ha- transplanting the teeth, places the bit of the patient ; he merely subject is a just light, and will, we states that he was a private of hope and presume, induce all who s the Grenadier Guards, and have thought of trying it, to give it therefore probably not of a ple- up as an experiment very likely to thoric habit. In Russia, the common treatment of a fit of intoxica- fail

, and as almost certain to prove tion is the affusion of cold water, injurious. which is generally practised by

We have not forgotten the last placing the body under a current essay of Salus, nor are we disposed of water from the mouth of a to undervalue his efforts or the usepump. In France, the common ful tendency of his writings.

He, practice is to administer a strong however, who is not sick, or does solution of the subcarbonate of

not believe himself to be so, is not ammonia.- 1b.

commonly disposed to seek a remeDEATH FROM THE BITE OF A VIPER. dy, nor is he who is suffering from

On the 26th of August, 1824, a the want of athletic exercise and reshepherd of Radonsk, near Marien- creation, likely to examine the werder, caught a viper in a wood, proofs in favor of the gymnasium till The latter let the reptile twine it- he is led, from some cause or other, self round his arm, and allowed it to believe that such proofs really to put its head in his mouth, on exist. We must often consult the which the viper bit his tongue. prejudices and weakness of the inva

The part immediately swelled solid if we wish to benefit him; the much, that when the man reached lesson, or the dose, or the diet, may the nearest village he was unable be too long, or large, or frequent, to speak; the swelling increased for his appetite, capacity or digesrapidly, so that his tongue hung tion. We think, however, that after partly out of his mouth ; and two hours afterwards the poor man died an interval of some length, those for a victim to his imprudence.

whom we endeavor to provide acArch. Gen. from Rust's Mag. ceptable and salutary fare, will be

ready for another lecture from our A mode of treatment employed in persevering and benevolent corresThrace, in cases of the bite of rabid pondent. We have not forgotten animals, has been communicated to the French Academy. It consists of

some other favors received. making incisions under the tongue at

The following precepts are taken any period of the disease, and with from the New Haven Journal. The out any regard to the appearance of anonymous writer might well assume the ordinary pustules there.

Io Thrace, this remedy is regarded as

the title of Experience, for we know infallible, and no apprehensions of nothing of the kind which experihydrophobia are entertained. ence will more fully prove to be in

N. P. A. the highest degree useful.

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DIRECTIONS TO PREVENT SICK• drink as much as they can in or

der to strengthen them. Weak1. So soon as you feel too un ness to be sure usually attends well to attend to your ordinary the attack of disease, but this business, lay it aside at once, and weakness is not from exhaustion, dismiss all care and anxiety about or to be relieved by food or wine. it; as rest and relaxation both of 5. If, after a fair trial of what body and mind, are of the great- is above recommended, you are est consequence.

still unsuccessful in throwing off 2. Observe a rigid abstinence, the disease, and find that you as to diet, by eating no food but must be sick in good earnest, send that of the simplest and lightest for a physician who is worthy of kind; and no more of this than the your confidence, and follow his appetite craves, which will not dirpetions implicitly. be much. You will not starve to

EXPERIENCE. death during the first few days of an illness, though you may starve Dr. Bedale, of Manchester, , out the disease.

England, recently swam from 3. Avoid all kinds of spirit, George's Dock, Liverpool, to Runwine, ale, and even cider. Dis- core, some 17 miles, in three hours miss care, but never attempt to and a half. He previously covered drown it with stimulating liquor his body with a composition of oil, unless you would increase the vi- &c. and was attended by some olence sevenfold. It is surprising friends in a boat. that so many people should imbibe the absurd notion, that rum, wine,

Artists, editors and other studi&c. are necessary in all manner ous professions are not happy, for of complaints.

this reason; they cannot enjoy men4. Take no quack medicines, tal repose. A state of lassitude or anything else, with the nature and languor succeeds to that. of of which you are not well ac- overstrained, anxious exertion. quainted. These few simple di

DICTIONARY. rections will be proper in the

Alveola, should be alveolus, a sockcommencement of nineteentwen- et; alveoli the sockets of the teeth. tieths of the diseases of this coun Acini, the small glandiform bodies try, taken as they rise; and if fol- of the liver. lowed, will throw off a large pro Caries, rotteoness. portion of them and mitigate the

Diverticulum, a wastegate, or carest, so that their course will be vity to receive for a timè a portion milder, and their terminations of blood. more favorable. Many diseases

Fistula, a long and sinuous ulcer are rendered untractable, and with a narrow opening. many lives lost, by improper inan

Incisor, a cutting tooth. agement during the first twenty- tooth ; molares, plural.

Molaris, a grinder, or grinding four hours of an illness, and before any medical assistance is We sometimes use these letters to

N. P. A., newspaper authority.

imply that the article over them is Nothing is more incorrect or not ours. It is mostly used when injurious than the theory which we cannot ascertain from what advises sick persons to eat and source it has been taken.

deemed necessary.

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