The History of the Rise, Progress, and Accomplishment of the Abolition of the African Slave-trade by the British Parliament, Band 2

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, 1808
 

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Thomas Clarkson, an ardent advocate of British Abolition details the road to the Act of the Abolition of the Slave Trade that was passed in 1807. The book orginally published in 1808, highlights his ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

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Seite 517 - only lo discover sights of woe, Regions of sorrow, doleful shades, where peace ' And rest can never dwell, hope never comes That comes to all; hut torture without end Still urges?
Seite 184 - brought us To the man-degrading mart, All sustain'd by patience, taught us Only by a broken heart: % " Deem our nation brutes no longer, Till some reason you shall find Worthier of regard, and stronger, Than the colour of our kind. Slaves of gold ! whose sordid dealings Tarnish all your boasted powers, Prove that
Seite 183 - screws, Are the means, which duty urges Agents of his will to use ? " Hark ! he answers. Wild tornadoes, Strewing yonder sea with wrecks, Wasting towns, plantations, meadows, Are the voice with which he speaks. He, foreseeing what vexations Afric's sons should undergo, Fix.'d their tyrants' habitations Where his whirlwinds answer—No.
Seite 182 - Forced from home and all its pleasures, Afric's coast I left forlorn, To increase a stranger's treasures, O'er the raging billows borne ; Men from England bought and sold me, Paid my price in paltry gold ; But, though theirs they have inroll'd me,
Seite 184 - shall find Worthier of regard, and stronger, Than the colour of our kind. Slaves of gold ! whose sordid dealings Tarnish all your boasted powers, Prove that you have human feelings, Ere you proudly question ours.
Seite 183 - claim; Skins may differ, but affection Dwells in black and white the same. " Why did all-creating Nature Make the plant, for which we toil ? Sighs must fan it, tears must water, Sweat of
Seite 183 - ye masters, iron-hearted, Lolling at your jovial boards, Think, how many backs have smarted For the sweets your cane affords. " Is there, as you sometimes tell us, Is there one, who rules
Seite 183 - Still in thought as free as ever, What are England's rights, I ask, Me from my delights to sever, Me to torture, me to task ? Fleecy locks and black complexion Cannot
Seite 184 - By our blood in Afric wasted, Ere our necks received the chain ; By the miseries, which we tasted Crossing, in your barks, the main; By our sufferings^ since you brought us To the man-degrading mart, All
Seite 348 - OF THE Africans, excluded, with the most virtuous resolution, the sweets, to which they had been accustomed, from their lips. By the best computation I was able to make from notes taken down in my journey, no fewer than three hundred thousand persons had abandoned the use of sugar. Having travelled over Wales, and two

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