Autobiography, a Collection of the Most Instructive and Amusing Lives Ever Published, Band 8

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Hunt and Clarke, 1827
 

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Seite 146 - I had no sooner spoken these words, but a loud, though yet gentle noise came from the heavens (for it was like nothing on earth), which did so comfort and cheer me that I took my petition as granted, and that I had the sign I demanded, whereupon, also, I resolved to print my book.
Seite 59 - Hereupon, going towards him, I courteously, with my hat in my hand, desired him to do me the honour that I may deliver the lady her ribband or bouquet again ; but he roughly answering me, Do you think I will give it you, when I have refused it to her...
Seite 82 - ... down backwards on his head. One of my footmen hereupon, who was a little Shropshire boy, freed my foot out of the stirrup; the other, which was a great fellow, having run away as soon as he saw the first assault. This gave me time to get upon my legs, and to put myself in the best posture I could with that poor remnant of a weapon.
Seite 60 - I replied, nay then, sir, I will make you restore it by force ; whereupon also, putting on my hat and reaching at his, he to save himself ran away, and, after a long course in the meadow, finding that I had almost overtook him, he turned short, and running to the young lady, was about to put the ribband on her hand, when I, seizing upon his arm, said to the young lady, it was I that gave it.
Seite 43 - ... him incapable of his everlasting happiness, it will be fit, by a serious repentance, to expiate and emaculate those faults, and for the rest, trust to the mercy of God his Creator, Redeemer, and Preserver, who, being our Father, and knowing well in what a weak condition through infirmities we are, will, I doubt not, commiserate those transgressions we commit when they are done without desire to offend his divine majesty, and together rectify our understanding through his grace...
Seite 24 - English works are extant, which though they be rare in their kind, yet are far short of expressing those perfections he had in the Greek and Latin tongue, and all divine and human literature. His life was most holy and exemplary, insomuch that about Salisbury, where he lived beneficed for many years, he was little less than sainted.
Seite 30 - ... occur in this world; so I believe, since my coming into this world my soul hath formed or produced certain faculties which are almost as useless for this life, as the above-named senses were for the mother's womb; and these faculties are hope, faith, love, and joy, since they never rest or fix upon any transitory or perishing object in this world, as extending themselves to something further than can be here given, and indeed acquiesce only in the perfect, eternal and infinite.
Seite 149 - If men get name, for some one virtue: then, What man art thou, that art so many men, All-virtuous Herbert! On whose every part Truth might spend all her voice, fame all her art. Whether thy learning they would take, or wit, Or valour, or thy...
Seite 80 - I did not only for very honest reasons, but, to speak ingenuously, because that affection passed betwixt me and another lady (who I believe was the fairest of her time) as nothing could divert it. I had not been long in London when a violent burning fever seized upon me. which brought me almost to my death, though at last I did by slow degrees recover my health.
Seite 125 - It is well known to those that wait in my chamber, that the shirts, waistcoats, and other garments I wear next my body, are sweet, beyond what either easily can be believed, or hath been observed in any else, which sweetness also was found to be in my breath above others, before I used to take tobacco...

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