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12, YORK-STREET, COVENT GARDEN, LONDON. Printed by JOHN C. FRANCIS, Atheneum Press, Iook's-court, Cursitor-street, Chancery-lane, E.O.; and Published by the said

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This Day's ATHENÆUM contains Articles on
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LONDON, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1888.

Panfilo of Boccaccio's "Teseide. He appears to

base his argument on the fact that in French PamCONTENT 8,-No 145.

phile is used of the knave of clubs in a game of NOTES:-Pamphlet, 261 - Shakspeariana, 202-Scotch Mining cards, also called Pamphile ; but though there may Terms, 264–Kirk-Grims-First Reviews - Indifferent, 265* Eastward Ho’–Norwich Pamphlet-Snow in July — Popular possibly be some connexion between the knave of Notions of Eclipses, 266.

clubs called Pamphile and the servant called PanQUERIES :-Dictionary Desiderata—"Confessor of the House filo by Boccaccio, I am at a loss to see what con

hold" – Choir - Funeral Custom - Glasgow Antiquities-nexion there can be between this knave of clubs
White Elephant Note in Rogera's Italy - Ross and and the servant Panfilo) and our word pamphlet.
Sutherland-Nonsense Verses-Pegge, 267-Labour-in-Vain
Court – Ronsard – Herrick - Aldermen of Billingsgate - ! reject this derivation, therefore, most uphesitat-
Thomson and

'Winter' – “ Art for art's sake " - " Forty ingly.*
stripes save one" - Liverpool Baptismal Registry - Red
Book of the Exchequer-Invasion of England - Dollars, 263

As for the other derivations, from par un filet
-Nicoll Family - Praxedis - Posts at Cross Roads – Pro- and palme-(=paume)feuillet, they have been dis-
testant Schoolmaster' - Pinchbeck — Sully-Champaigne -
William Pitt-Authors Wanted, 269.

cussed ad nauseam, and seem to me so ludicrous

although the latter has been adopted by Littré and REPLIES :- Names of Dogs, 269- Rowlandson, 271–St. Ebbe by Mahn (in Webster)—that I will say no more

-Lavender Bush-Colours as Surnames, 272-Chartist, 273–
Killegrew, of Cornwall-Hamilton-Catholic Emancipation

about them; and I mention them only in the Act-Use of Spectacles..." of a certain ager-St. Swithin, hope that I may thus prevent their being brought 274-RussiaBlack, White, Red—Reform" Burns's Poems. 275- Proverb-Scarpines - Underground up

again. Jottings' - Death Bell – Fufty - Oxford and Cambridge Magazine, 278– Flemish Brasses---Hornet of Joshua-Tene, derivation from papyrus, first put forward, appa

My own feelings are decidedly in favour of the mental Bridges-Byron's Town House - Kimpton - Dress of Waiters - Fish Guard — Device - Brooke, of Astley, 277– rently, by Skinner, who thinks that there was an Hall-T. Sword of the Black Prince-Cawsey-Hampton comer Guide- older form of pamphlet, viz., pampilet, and

comBooks, 278.

pares for the intrusion of the m the Old Dutch NOTES ON BOOKS :- Dictionary of National Biography,' | by Mr. Wedgwood in his 'Dict.' and also in

pampier=paper.f This view has been advocated Vol. XVI.-Mee's • Llanelly Parish Church.'

'N. & Q.’ (6h . i. 441), by Weigand, and by Notices to Correspondents, &c.

Scheler ; and all that I can now do is to adduce additional arguments in favour of it.

And first with regard to the intrusion of an m Potes.

before the second p. This is well shown by the

Old Dutch pampier quoted above, and for which PAMPHLET.

see especially Hexham, and is supported by pamThis word has been much discussed in ‘N. & Q.;' pilio=papilio (in the sense of pavilion in Ducange but, unfortunately, to very little purpose. The and in the sense of butterfly in Wülcker's Wright, only real tangible facts that I can find in the dif- 261, 10, and see also Diefenbach); as well as by ferent notes, which I have carefully read through, pampaver, apparently=papaver, in Ducange (ed, are, firstly, that the Low Latin form panfletus is L. Favre). And that mp may become mph or nph found in De Bury's 'Philobiblon' (about 1344 ?), is shown by panphinus=pampinus (Dief.), and by chap. viii. (see 2nd S. ii. 477; 3rd S. v. 167; 6th S. the surnames Pamplin and Pamphlin in the London i. 441; ii. 156; Scheler, s. v. “Pamphlet"; and Directory of 1882 ; comp. also the surname PamProf. Skeat in his ' Dict.,' second edition, supple-philon (in the same directory) with the common ment); and, secondly, that one of the earliest French name Papillon (Larchey); and in Littré, English forms is pamfilet

, which is found in Hoc- pamphile (3)= espèce de papillon. But not only did cleve's (or Occleve's) ' Poems' (? date), ed. Mason, papyrus or its derivatives become nasalized, its r 1796, p. 77 (see 3rd S. iv. 482 ; 6th S. ii. 156 ; and sometimes evidently became l. Comp. papilio in Prof. Skeat, Trans. Philol. Soc., 1888-90, p. 15). Ducange="scyrpeum vasculum," and that it is a

, There is, indeed, a good deal said about a certain corrupted form from papyrus is shown not only by Pamphila, who lived in the first century and wrote this meaning but also by Ducange's remark,“ sed books, and whose name has been thought to have infra papyrio scribitur.” And compare also Diefergiven origin to the word (see Dr. Doran's note bach's " papiluus (st. papyrus) ags. ilugsegg," (pro3rd S. v. 169, and also 46: S. vii. 439), and this bably a kind of sedge), and the Span. papel.

We lady's cause was espoused by Prof. Skeat in his ‘Dict. But later on a certain Pamphilus was dis- * I notice that in Diefenbach's 'Glossary' pam-(pan-) covered, who had written a comedy in the twelfth philus is given the two meanings of “mynnenknecht” century, and M. Gaston Paris was stated to be of and" en bok van der leue" =, I suppose, a book about opinion that the word pamphlet was formed from love”), but pamphlets have to do with anything rather

than with love, bis name (6th S. ii. 156). And finally Prof. Skeat

† As will be seen, however, further on, I am of opinion (Trans. Philol. Soc., 1888-90, p. 15) has adopted that papyrus may have been more or less mixed up with this suggestion, only that his Pamphilus is the pampinus, and pamphlet have resulted from the mixture.

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thus :

are now in a position to understand the words

SHAKSPEARIANA, panphilus, panfilus, and panifil, found in Ducange in the meaning of “navis species,” for we see that

THE OBELI OF THE GLOBE EDITION IN 'As these are merely corruptions of papyrus, I which is You Like It.'-I. i. 1:known to have been used to make boats and small “As I remember, Adam, it was upon this fashion vessels, sails and all. See Forcellini, and cf. Dief- bequeathed me by will but poor a thousand crowns, and, enbach's " papirotum......en grot schep."

as thou sayest, charged my brother, on his blessing, to I have said in note + that I think it not impro- Old Adam had heard his dying master charge

breed me well." bable that papyrus and pampinus have got mixed up together in consequence of the likeness of their Oliver, as he hoped for his blessing, to care for his corrupted forms and of a certain resemblance in younger brother; and now, seeing how utterly the signification, and I will now endeavour to supply solemn charge had been neglected, and the terms some evidence of this. And first, as regards form, of the settlement being unknown to him, he was I find in Diefenbach, “Papinus, v. Pampinus.

anxious to know what provision, independent of Papyrus"; but under “Papyrus" he does not Oliver, had been made for Orlando. We must seem quite satisfied about its corruption into suppose that a question about this has just been papinus. Under “ Pampinus,” however, I find as put by him to Orlando, and that it is with the corruptions panphinus and pampilus (in Wülckers answer of the latter that the play commences. The Wright, 810, 15, pamplus), from which it is evident continuation of a conversation supposed to have that we might also easily have had pamphilus and commenced behind the scenes has on the stage a panphilus (=panfilus), forms which I have tried fine dramatic effect. The same artistic artifice is to show above have really arisen out of papyrus. employed at the commencement of Act III. Thus It is evident, moreover, that we might have had understanding the opening of the play, I point it the form papilus from either (see note 1). And in signification also, so it seems to me, there is just

As I remember, Adam, it was upon this fashion: enough resemblance to promote the chance of con bequeathed by will but poor a thousand crowns; and, as fusion which was already rendered likely by the thou sayest, charged my brother, on his blessing, to treat agreement in form. Even in classical Latin pam; These, succinctly stated, were the two items in the pinus has the secondary meaning of " vine leaf," settlement referring to Orlando. The charge which whilst in the French form pampe of the Low Lat. Adam had heard the dying man give to his elder pampa (seo Ducange), which is derived from

pampinus, or rather from its root pamp, it has come to son had been expressed in the will as well, signify the leaves of certain grasses (wheat, barley,

II. vii. 70:&c., see Littré), and has thus moved on a good

Why, who cries out on pride, deal in the direction of the papyrus. But, indeed,

That can therein tax any private party?

Doth it not flow as hugely as the sea, between the leaves of any plant or tree and paper +Till that the weary very means do ebb? there is evidently always some connexion, for do we not say a leaf of paper"?

Singer's emendationIt will be gathered from what I have said above

Till that the wearer's very means do ebb, that I agree with Prof. Skeat and others in deriv. I cannot away with. To what purpose is very ing pamphlet from a word pamphilus ; only my here? Who, either, in prose or in verse, would pamphilus, unlike theirs, is not a man.

I have think of saying, “a man has spent his very money," endeavoured to show that this form pamphilus may or “a man has spent his money itself"? I venture come from papyrus alone, or from pampinus alone; on an emendation involving the change only of a but I am inclined to believe that it has come from single letter :a mixture of the two. And it seems to me not im

Till that the weary very moans do ebb. probable that pampinus may have furnished the m Foolish pride lasts till the last gasp of life; till the and have contributed to the shortening of the i (I weary death-moans themselves are sinking into will not say to the shifting of the accent, for in the eternal silence. “Weary very"; bow aptly do the Greek tránupos the accent is on the first syllable); sounds convey the sense! I seem to have heard whilst its signification of " leaf” may, in conjunc- them in the troubled breathing of the dying ; I tion with the diminutive form in -et), have helped have often heard them at ebb-tide, after a storm, to give to pamphlet the notion of a "paper leaflet” spoken by the sea moaning itself to rest. Having or of a work comprising only a few leaves or pages. regard to the simile in the passage, I cannot but

F. CHANCE. think that Shakspeare intended to express at once Sydenham Hill.

the stilling of the proud waves and the weary

moans in which the proudest human life must close I The changes would be papyrus, papilus (with the i

at last. For a similar use of very cf. Cymbeline, probably short), pampilus, pamphilus, and panphilus (or panflus). Liddell and Scott say, 8.0" nám upos," that IV. ii. 346 :it is generally but sometimes

Last night the very gods showed me a vision,

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