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extensively, and wherever he was known he was loved. The religious of all parties mourned for him as if they had lost a father; and in various pulpits his character was depicted as the man of God, and his loss deplored as that of one who went about doing good.

Several of the numerous philanthropic and charitable institutions which he had during life so zealously supported, inserted in their minutes tributes of gratitude to his memory; and, among others, the London Missionary Society, of which he had been pre-eminently the advocate and benefactor. The following resolution is extracted from the records of this great and beneficent association:

On the mournful information of the decease of the late Rev. Dr. Waugh being communicated to the Directors, at their meeting held on the Monday evening next after the deeply-lamented event, the following resolution was adopted by the board :

• Resolved unanimously - That the Directors cannot but contemplate this solemn event with deep emotion, when they consider that the Rev. Dr. Waugh was one of those ministers who subscribed their names to the Declaration—That it was their earnest desire to exert themselves for introducing the Gospel to the heathen (February 17, 1795); that he was one of a committee appointed to correspond with ministers in the country, to excite their attention to this important object; that he had a prominent part in the formation of the plan of the Missionary Society; that from its

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commencement he took a lively and active interest in all its affairs; that he occupied the place of chairman of one of the most important of its committees during the period of twenty-eight years; and that in every way, both in public and private, he laboured to promote the objects of the institution. While the sanctity of his personal character, the amenity of his manners, the warmth of his affection, and the devoted ardour of his zeal, must long live in their grateful remembrance, the Directors would offer devout thanksgivings to Almighty God for having continued him during so many years to this Society, and to the church; and for having honoured him to be so extensively useful even to the end of his course. With his bereaved family and congregation they most affectionately sympathise, and earnestly pray that the great Head of the church would supply all their need, according to his riches in glory by Christ Jesus.”

The funeral took place on the 22d of December, and was attended by an assemblage of mourners which, for number and respectability, has seldom been equalled in London. The house in Salisbury Place being much too small for the reception of the great multitude of friends who wished to attend, they were invited to meet at the chapel of the Rev. J. Stratton, Paddington. Previous to the procession commencing, the Rev. Rowland Hill and the Rev. Edward Irving offered up, each, an appropriate prayer. The body was then deposited in the hearse, which was preceded in its way to Bunhill Fields by thirty-three of the Sunday-school teachers and juvenile members of his congregation, on foot. Forty-two mourning coaches and thirteen private carriages followed, containing the family and relatives of the deceased, ministers of all denominations (of wbom the number was very great), the elders and managers of his congregation, and of those of Oxendon and Albion Chapels, a deputation from the directors of the London Missionary Society, and his numerous private friends. The procession extended nearly half a mile, and an immense concourse of persons followed the hearse to Bunhill Fields. An affecting address was delivered at the grave by the Rev. Dr. Winter, upon this text,-“ Your fathers, where are they? and the prophets, do they live for ever ?” After the body had been committed to the family tomb, to rest beside the dust of his beloved son Alexander till the great “ gathering day," an impressive and comprehensive prayer, by the Rev. Mr. Broadfoot, concluded the funeral solemnity.

On the following Sabbath his funeral sermon was preached in Wells Street Chapel by Mr. Broadfoot, from Job, v. 26,-" Thou shalt come to thy grave in a full age, like as a shock of corn cometh in in his season.” This excellent discourse was subsequently published at the request of the congregation, and is probably known to the majority of our readers; it is enough to say that it was truly worthy of the solemn occasion. Many other sermons were preached in commemoration of the departed by his brethren in and around London; and biographical sketches of his cha

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racter and public services appeared in all the religious periodicals of the day. His congregation testified their love, and veneration, and gratitude, by an affectionate liberality which ought not to pass unnoticed.* They defrayed the entire expenses of his public funeral, claiming it, in the most delicate manner, “ as their privilege;" they expressed their regard and sympathy for his widow, not in words alone, but by acts of singular kindness and generosity; and they erected to his memory an elegant tablet of marble, in Wells Street Chapel, with the following inscription :

* It ought also to be recorded, to the honour of this respectable body of people, and as an evidence that the labours of their departed pastor, who was so peculiarly characterised as a peacemaker, have not been in vain, that, notwithstanding much diversity of wishes and opinions among them regarding the choice of a successor, there has been no actual disunion as respects Christian feeling or fellowship; and we may venture to add, that there will never be any permanent disunion, if they continue to follow with a single eye the counsel, not of frail and fallible man, but of Him who hath said, “ Blessed are the peacemakers; for they shall be called the children of God."

TO THE MEMORY OF
THE REVEREND ALEXANDER WAUGH, D.D.
BORN AT EAST GORDON, BERWICKSHIRE, AUGUST 16TH, 1754,

ORDAINED TO THE OFFICE OF THE CHRISTIAN MINISTRY

AT NEWTOWN IN THE PARISH OF MELROSE, N. B., AUGUST 30TH, 1780;
TRANSLATED TO THE PASTORAL CHARGE OF WELLS STREET CHAPEL, LONDON, MAY 9TH, 1782 ;

DIED DECEMBER

GIFTED WITH A HIGHLY CULTIVATED MIND,
EXEMPLARY FOR CHEERFUL PIETY, UNIFORM CHARITY, AND DIFFUSIVE BENEVOLENCE,
HE CORDIALLY UNITED WITH CHRISTIANS OF EVERY DENOMINATION IN EXTENDING THE GOSPEL OF CHRIST,

AND PROMOTING THE KNOWLEDGE AND HAPPINESS OF MANKIND.

TO THE SCOTS SECESSION CHURCH HE WAS CONSCIENTIOUSLY ATTACHED,
AND WARMLY AFFECTED TO HIS NATIVE COUNTRY, WHOSE SONS, ON THEIR ARRIVAL IN THIS METROPOLIS,

EVER FOUND IN HIM A WISE COUNSELLOR AND A KIND FRIEND.

AS ONE OF THE FOUNDERS OF THE LONDON MISSIONARY SOCIETY IN

HE GAVE UNCEASINGLY TO ITS IMPORTANT CONCERNS A DEVOTEDNESS OF MIND
AND A DEGREE OF UNWEARIED EXERTION WHICH WERE EMINENTLY INSTRUMENTAL TO ITS PROSPERITY.

IN THE RELATIONS OF HUSBAND, FATHER, AND FRIEND,
HE WAS DISTINGUISHED FOR GENTLENESS, AFFECTION, AND EVERY VIRTUE WHICH A DORNS THE CHRISTIAN.
ON THE CLAIMS OF THE WIDOW AND ORPHAN HE EVER BESTOWED HIS KINDEST SYMPATHY;

AND BY THE YOUNG, HIS ZEAL FOR THEIR SPIRITUAL IMPROVEMENT,
AND THE WARMTH OF HIS SOLICITUDE FOR THEIR BEST INTERESTS, WILL LONG BE HAD IN REMEMBRANCE.

THE CONGREGATION,
WHO FOR NEARLY FORTY-SIX YEARS ENJOYED THE SINGULAR PRIVILEGE OF HIS INSTRUCTIONS,

EMINENT FOR THE PROMOTION OF SOCIAL PEACE AND SPIRITUAL PROSPERITY,
TO PERPETUATE THEIR DEEP SENSE OF THE INESTIMABLE WORTH AND FAITHFUL SERVICES

OF THEIR LATE BELOVED PASTOR,
AND IN GRATITUDE TO THE GIVER OF ALL GOOD,

HAVE RAISED THIS TABLET.

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