The History of Pendennis

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The Floating Press, 01.02.2011 - 1441 Seiten
With an unmatched wit and a keen appreciation for the inanity of social mores, William Makepeace Thackeray provides his own unique spin on the family history genre in The History of Pendennis. Following a young lad who makes his way to London in search of love and a livelihood, the narrative tears through juicy family secrets, shadowy machinations, and all manner of plots and conspiracies. If you liked Vanity Fair, you'll love The History of Pendennis.

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Inhalt

Chapter XXXIX Colonel Altamont Appears and Disappears
725
Chapter XL Relates to Mr Harry Fokers Affairs
743
Chapter XLI Carries the Reader Both to Richmond and Greenwich
764
Chapter XLII Contains a Novel Incident
781
Chapter XLIII Alsatia
801
Chapter XLIV In Which the Colonel Narrates Some of His Adventures
814
Chapter XLV A Chapter of Conversations
834
Chapter XLVI Miss Amorys Partners
858

Chapter VII In Which the Major Makes His Appearance
134
Chapter VIII In Which Pen is Kept Waiting at the Door While the Reader is Informed Who Little Laura Was
150
Chapter IX In Which the Major Opens the Campaign
171
Chapter X Facing the Enemy
184
Chapter XI Negotiation
196
Chapter XII In Which a Shooting Match is Proposed
213
Chapter XIII A Crisis
229
Chapter XIV In Which Miss Fotheringay Makes a New Engagement
246
Chapter XV The Happy Village
259
Chapter XVI More Storms in the Puddle
277
Chapter XVII Which Concludes the First Part of this History
298
Chapter XVIII Alma Mater
319
Chapter XIX Pendennis of Boniface
335
Chapter XX Rakes Progress
358
Chapter XXI Flight After Defeat
377
Chapter XXII Prodigals Return
392
Chapter XXIII New Faces
408
Chapter XXIV A Little Innocent
438
Chapter XXV Contains Both Love and Jealousy
459
Chapter XXVI A House Full of Visitors
476
Chapter XXVII Contains Some BallPractising
501
Chapter XXVIII Which is Both Quarrelsome and Sentimental
517
Chapter XXIX Babylon
543
Chapter XXX The Knights of the Temple
564
Chapter XXXI Old and New Acquaintances
580
Chapter XXXII In Which the Printers Devil Comes to the Door
602
Chapter XXXIII Which is Passed in the Neighbourhood of Ludgate Hill
625
Chapter XXXIV In Which the History Still Hovers About Fleet Street
643
Chapter XXXV Dinner in the Row
654
Chapter XXXVI The Pall Mall Gazette
674
Chapter XXXVII Where Pen Appears in Town and Country
684
Chapter XXXVIII In Which the Sylph Reappears
710
Chapter XLVII Monseigneur Samuse
882
Chaptyer XLVIII a Visit of Politeness
908
Chapter XLIX In Shepherds Inn
918
Chapter L Or Near the Temple Garden
929
Chapter LI The Happy Village Again
945
Chapter LII Which Had Very Nearly Been the Last of the Story
956
Chapter LIII A Critical Chapter
977
Chapter LIV Convalescence
995
Chapter LV Fannys Occupations Gone
1016
Chapter LVI In Which Fanny Engages a New Medical Man
1036
Chapter LVII Foreign Ground
1056
Chapter LVIII Fairoaks to Let
1077
Chapter LIX Old Friends
1096
Chapter LX Explanations
1120
Chapter LXI Conversations
1132
Chapter LXII The Way of the World
1157
Chapter LXIII Which Accounts Perhaps for Chapter LXI
1183
Chapter LXIV Phyllis and Corydon
1208
Chapter LXV Temptation
1218
Chapter LXVI In Which Pen Begins His Canvass
1238
Chapter LXVII In Which Pen Begins to Doubt About His Election
1255
Chapter LXVIII In Which the Major is Bidden to Stand and Deliver
1278
Chapter LXIX In Which the Major Neither Yields His Money nor His Life
1297
Chapter LXX In Which Pendennis Counts His Eggs
1314
Chapter LXXI Fiat Justitia
1325
Chapter LXXII In Which the Decks Begin to Clear
1340
Chapter LXXIII Mr And Mrs Sam Huxter
1355
Chapter LXXIV Shows How Arthur Had Better Have Taken a ReturnTicket
1374
Chapter LXXV A Chapter of MatchMaking
1387
Chapter LXXVI Exeunt Omnes
1403
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Über den Autor (2011)

William Makepeace Thackeray was born in Calcutta, India, where his father was in service to the East India Company. After the death of his father in 1816, he was sent to England to attend school. Upon reaching college age, Thackeray attended Trinity College, Cambridge, but he left before completing his degree. Instead, he devoted his time to traveling and journalism. Generally considered the most effective satirist and humorist of the mid-nineteenth century, Thackeray moved from humorous journalism to successful fiction with a facility that was partially the result of a genial fictional persona and a graceful, relaxed style. At his best, he held up a mirror to Victorian manners and morals, gently satirizing, with a tone of sophisticated acceptance, the inevitable failure of the individual and of society. He took up the popular fictional situation of the young person of talent who must make his way in the world and dramatized it with satiric directness in The Luck of Barry Lyndon (1844), with the highest fictional skill and appreciation of complexities inherent within the satiric vision in his masterpiece, Vanity Fair (1847), and with a great subtlety of point of view and background in his one historical novel, Henry Esmond (1852). Vanity Fair, a complex interweaving in a vast historical panorama of a large number of characters, derives its title from John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress and attempts to invert for satirical purposes, the traditional Christian image of the City of God. Vanity Fair, the corrupt City of Man, remains Thackeray's most appreciated and widely read novel. It contrasts the lives of two boarding-school friends, Becky Sharp and Amelia Smedley. Constantly attuned to the demands of incidental journalism and his sense of professionalism in his relationship with his public, Thackeray wrote entertaining sketches and children's stories and published his humorous lectures on eighteenth-century life and literature. His own fiction shows the influence of his dedication to such eighteenth-century models as Henry Fielding, particularly in his satire, which accepts human nature rather than condemns it and takes quite seriously the applicability of the true English gentleman as a model for moral behavior. Thackeray requested that no authorized biography of him should ever be written, but members of his family did write about him, and these accounts were subsequently published.

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