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Christian Science is contained within public; the fourth studies the relations the Christian religion, and it aims only of climate and civilization, and the to make active application of funda- fifth shows the services which physical mental principles and to eliminate the training may render to loyalty and errors gathered about them. The book the value of athletic sports and exerdescribes a great number of cases, it cises in moral training. All these explains many of the new discoveries topics of high importance are treated through which physicians and psychol- originally and it is safe to say that ogists have armed mind and soul very few readers will at first sight against evil and weakness and shows agree with the author. It is also safe their identity with Christian principles, to say that the more they consider what and lastly it furnishes the reader with he says the more of his sayings they a goodly number of brief sayings will accept, and will soon find themadapted to different temperaments, selves wishing that they could accept and a variety of brief humble prayers. the whole. That they do not, or canWith it self-cure becomes possible not, or perhaps never will fully accept without the embarrassment of confes- them, arises from the author's gift of sion. To have written such a book making his readers think, with the inis to have rendered a great service to evitable result that their thought is humanity. A. C. McClurg Co.

not on exactly the same line as his.

The Macmillan Co. The last ten years have been more fertile in original books than the pre- It is humiliating but true that Amervious twenty, books which neither icans and even Britonis baye derived scorn nor abandon old truths, but en- their deepest and most comprehensive deavor to show their superiority either impressions of India from the verse in content or in usefulness to the and fiction of Mr. Kipling, in spite of common conception of them. Profes- the enormous volume of missionary resor Josiah Royce has written more ports and the multitude of travellers' than one of these books, and he calls books, but it is also true that from his newest volume, “Race Questions, this condition of things it follows that Provincialism, and other American a book like Mr. John P. Jones's "India: Problems," defines it as an effort to ap- its Life and Thought" finds scores of ply to certain American problems the readers to-day, where only one would principles summed up in his "The Phi- have awaited it before the era of losophy of Loyalty," and expresses the "Plain Tales from the Hills." The hope that the various opinions ex- author has lived thirty years in India, pressed in it may be judged in the in continuous touch with the people, light of that philosophy. Of the five studying their life and thought with essays in the book, the first will eagerness, and he modestly asserts an scarcely be acceptable to many readers. humble claim to speak upon the subbecause it makes very short work of ject. He has somewhat to say of each all talk about superiority of race, and of the nine great religions found in shows the omnipresence of prejudice the India of to-day, and he writes at in deciding the point. The second, considerable length on Burma before “Provincialism,” explains the good coming to his chapters on the "Hindu work which provincialism may do; the Caste System," an elaborate statement third, "The Limitations of the Public,” of the subject. Chapters on the Bhadilates upon the ineffectiveness of large gavad Gita, Popular Hinduism, Home bodies of the idealistically disposed Life of Hindus, Islam in India, Christ

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and the Buddha, and the Modern Re. Margharita of Savoy had given the ligious Movement follow, and last of Duke, and the peak was named for her. all a hopeful chapter on "The Progress This peak is 16,815 feet above the level of Christianity in India." Christ only, of the sea, and it towers finely in one he says, in the eyes of modern educated of the panoramic views with which India, stands the perfect test of char- this narrative is illustrated, white with acter, and he declares that there is not eternal snow. The expedition did its a town in India in which there are not work thoroughly. It traversed the men of power and influence, studying whole range and climbed every peak. the life of Jesus, and reading such It discovered the complete topography books as the Imitation, which a Brah- of the mountains, and made observainan is even now translating for publi- tions in meteorology, astronomy and cation by a Hindu firm. The doctrine magnetism. In the body of this volof the Incarnation, the acceptance of ume is given a direct, graphic and unthe cross of Christ as the highest ex- embellished narrative of the expedipression of God's love for man and tion; and in the appendices are the acceptance of the Christian concep- corded in detail the scientific results, tion of sin are also in his opinion gain- registers of the astronomical, geodetic, ing ground. As to that unrest of meteorological and altimetric observawhich certain good folk speak with tions, and a summary of the geological, such apparent longing for another mu- zoological and botanical survey; totiny, he declares that the British were gether with an article by Dr. Luigi never more firmly entrenched and pos- Hugues

the identification of sessed of more power in India than Ptolemy's “Mountains of the Moon" at the present time. The Macmillan with the Ruwenzori range. Lacking Co.

the time to write out himself an ac

count of the expedition and its resuls, The fascinations of ancient legend the Duke of the Abruzzi entrusted that and of modern adventure, and the solid work to his friend Cavaliere de Filippi, value of geographical and scientific dis- committing to him for that purpose his covery blend curiously in the volume own notes and records and the diaries entitled “Ruwenzori" in which the of his companions. The author has story of the Duke of the Abruzzi's fa- done his work well and his wife formous expedition to the equatorial snow merly Miss Fitzgerald of New Yorkranges of central Africa is fully and las translated the narrative into Enggraphically told. These snow ranges

lish. The volume is magnificently ilhave been identified with Ptolemy's lustrated with views and panoramas of "Mountains

the Moon"; they the mountain scenery, froin photoare the ice-clad peaks which old graphs taken by Cavaliere Vittoria tradition has obstinately asserted to lie Sella, who was one of the Duke's comat the sources of the Nile; yet it is only panions. There are 25 full-page plates, twenty years ago that Stanley obtained 5 panoramas and 3 maps, besides a the first far glimpse of them which large number of views printed with half disclosed their character, and two the text. Altogether this is one of the years since the Duke of the Abruzzi. most important of recent contributions lover of adventure and courageous to the literature of discovery and exploclimber of difficult peaks, led the expe- ration and the form in which it is predition which first climbed the summits sented is worthy of it. E. P. Dutton until at the highest point in the range & Co. the little flag

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